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Article: The application of 'dysexecutive syndrome' measures across cultures: Performance and checklist assessment in neurologically healthy and traumatically brain-injured Hong Kong Chinese volunteers

TitleThe application of 'dysexecutive syndrome' measures across cultures: Performance and checklist assessment in neurologically healthy and traumatically brain-injured Hong Kong Chinese volunteers
Authors
KeywordsAssessment
Dysexecutive syndromes
Brain injury
Cultures
Issue Date2002
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=INS
Citation
Journal of International Neuropsychological Society, 2002, v. 8 n. 6, p. 771-780 How to Cite?
AbstractDeficits in planning, self-regulation and attention are a relatively common consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such “dysexecutive” deficits tend to be most exposed in complex, real world situations. Consequently, clinicians often have to rely on interviews, questionnaires and observation in their assessments. While there is little doubt that dysexecutive symptoms occur across different cultures, the expression of those symptoms, the way in which they are experienced by others, and the propensity of friends/relatives to report negative features may vary considerably. The cross-cultural use of standardized checklists and measures that have predominantly been studied with English speaking, Western groups therefore requires empirical support. Here a group of 68 healthy Chinese speaking volunteers were asked to complete translations of 2 UK developed questionnaires (the Dysexecutive Questionnaire and Cognitive Failures Questionnaire) measures and to perform 2 “executive” tasks (The Six Elements Test and the Tower of Hanoi). Their self ratings and the ratings of close relatives were very close to those seen in the original UK standardization samples—as was their performance on the 2 tasks. Accordingly, the conditions for assessing their clinical sensitivity were met. Comparison between 30 Chinese patients with TBI and matched controls showed that both questionnaires and tests were sensitive to the deficits in this group. (JINS, 2002, 8, 771–780.)
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43487
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.633
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.348
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorManly, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:46:49Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:46:49Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of International Neuropsychological Society, 2002, v. 8 n. 6, p. 771-780en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1355-6177en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43487-
dc.description.abstractDeficits in planning, self-regulation and attention are a relatively common consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such “dysexecutive” deficits tend to be most exposed in complex, real world situations. Consequently, clinicians often have to rely on interviews, questionnaires and observation in their assessments. While there is little doubt that dysexecutive symptoms occur across different cultures, the expression of those symptoms, the way in which they are experienced by others, and the propensity of friends/relatives to report negative features may vary considerably. The cross-cultural use of standardized checklists and measures that have predominantly been studied with English speaking, Western groups therefore requires empirical support. Here a group of 68 healthy Chinese speaking volunteers were asked to complete translations of 2 UK developed questionnaires (the Dysexecutive Questionnaire and Cognitive Failures Questionnaire) measures and to perform 2 “executive” tasks (The Six Elements Test and the Tower of Hanoi). Their self ratings and the ratings of close relatives were very close to those seen in the original UK standardization samples—as was their performance on the 2 tasks. Accordingly, the conditions for assessing their clinical sensitivity were met. Comparison between 30 Chinese patients with TBI and matched controls showed that both questionnaires and tests were sensitive to the deficits in this group. (JINS, 2002, 8, 771–780.)en_HK
dc.format.extent70393 bytes-
dc.format.extent309306 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=INSen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of International Neuropsychological Society. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectAssessmenten_HK
dc.subjectDysexecutive syndromesen_HK
dc.subjectBrain injuryen_HK
dc.subjectCulturesen_HK
dc.titleThe application of 'dysexecutive syndrome' measures across cultures: Performance and checklist assessment in neurologically healthy and traumatically brain-injured Hong Kong Chinese volunteersen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1355-6177&volume=8&issue=6&spage=771&epage=780&date=2002&atitle=The+application+of+%27dysexecutive+syndrome%27+measures+across+cultures:+Performance+and+checklist+assessment+in+neurologically+healthy+and+traumatically+brain-injured+Hong+Kong+Chinese+volunteersen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S1355617702860052en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12240741-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036742146-
dc.identifier.hkuros83222-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177920300005-

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