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Article: Multicomponent X-ray emissions from regions near or on the pulsar surface

TitleMulticomponent X-ray emissions from regions near or on the pulsar surface
Authors
KeywordsPulsars: general
Radiation mechanisms: nonthermal
Radiation mechanisms: thermal
X-rays: stars
Issue Date1999
PublisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/2041-8205
Citation
Astrophysical Journal Letters, 1999, v. 515 n. 1 PART 1, p. 337-350 How to Cite?
AbstractWe present a model of X-ray emission from rotation-powered pulsars, which in general consist of one nonthermal component, two hard thermal components, and one soft thermal component. The nonthermal X-rays come from synchrotron radiation of e± pairs created in the strong magnetic field near the neutron star surface by curvature photons emitted by charged particles on their way from the outer gap to the neutron star surface. The first hard thermal X-ray component results from polar-cap heating by the return current in the polar gap. The second hard thermal X-ray component results from polar-cap heating by the return particles from the outer gap. Because of cyclotron resonance scattering, most of the hard thermal X-rays will be effectively reflected back to the stellar surface and eventually reemitted as soft thermal X-rays. However, some of the hard thermal X-rays can still escape along the open magnetic field lines, where the e+/e- pair density is low. Furthermore, the characteristic blackbody temperatures of the two hard X-ray components emitted from the polar-cap area inside the polar gap and the polar-cap area defined by the footprints of the outer-gap magnetic field lines are strongly affected by the surface magnetic field, which can be much larger than the dipolar field. In fact, the strong surface magnetic field can explain why the effective blackbody radiation area is nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than that deduced from the dipolar field for young pulsars (2 orders of magnitude less for old pulsars). Our model indicates how several possible X-ray components may be observed, depending on the magnetic inclination angle and viewing angle. Using the expected X-ray luminosity and spectra, we explain the observed X-ray spectra from pulsars such as Geminga, PSR B1055-52, PSR B0656+14, and PSR B1929+10.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43264
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.369
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:42:27Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:42:27Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAstrophysical Journal Letters, 1999, v. 515 n. 1 PART 1, p. 337-350en_HK
dc.identifier.issn2041-8205en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43264-
dc.description.abstractWe present a model of X-ray emission from rotation-powered pulsars, which in general consist of one nonthermal component, two hard thermal components, and one soft thermal component. The nonthermal X-rays come from synchrotron radiation of e± pairs created in the strong magnetic field near the neutron star surface by curvature photons emitted by charged particles on their way from the outer gap to the neutron star surface. The first hard thermal X-ray component results from polar-cap heating by the return current in the polar gap. The second hard thermal X-ray component results from polar-cap heating by the return particles from the outer gap. Because of cyclotron resonance scattering, most of the hard thermal X-rays will be effectively reflected back to the stellar surface and eventually reemitted as soft thermal X-rays. However, some of the hard thermal X-rays can still escape along the open magnetic field lines, where the e+/e- pair density is low. Furthermore, the characteristic blackbody temperatures of the two hard X-ray components emitted from the polar-cap area inside the polar gap and the polar-cap area defined by the footprints of the outer-gap magnetic field lines are strongly affected by the surface magnetic field, which can be much larger than the dipolar field. In fact, the strong surface magnetic field can explain why the effective blackbody radiation area is nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than that deduced from the dipolar field for young pulsars (2 orders of magnitude less for old pulsars). Our model indicates how several possible X-ray components may be observed, depending on the magnetic inclination angle and viewing angle. Using the expected X-ray luminosity and spectra, we explain the observed X-ray spectra from pulsars such as Geminga, PSR B1055-52, PSR B0656+14, and PSR B1929+10.en_HK
dc.format.extent220451 bytes-
dc.format.extent12158 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/2041-8205en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAstrophysical Journal Lettersen_HK
dc.rightsThe Astrophysical Journal. Copyright © University of Chicago Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectPulsars: generalen_HK
dc.subjectRadiation mechanisms: nonthermalen_HK
dc.subjectRadiation mechanisms: thermalen_HK
dc.subjectX-rays: starsen_HK
dc.titleMulticomponent X-ray emissions from regions near or on the pulsar surfaceen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0004-637X&volume=515&issue=pt 1&spage=337&epage=350&date=1999&atitle=Multicomponent+X-Ray+Emissions+from+Regions+near+or+on+the+Pulsar+Surfaceen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheng, KS: hrspksc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, KS=rp00675en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/307016en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033541219en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros40643-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033541219&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume515en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1 PART 1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage337en_HK
dc.identifier.epage350en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000080226400027-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, KS=9745798500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, L=38762428100en_HK

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