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Article: On the rotation and magnetic field evolution of superconducting strange stars

TitleOn the rotation and magnetic field evolution of superconducting strange stars
Authors
KeywordsDense matter
Magnetic fields
Stars: interiors
Stars: magnetic fields
Stars: rotation
Issue Date1997
PublisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/2041-8205
Citation
Astrophysical Journal Letters, 1997, v. 479 n. 2 PART I, p. 886-901 How to Cite?
AbstractAre pulsars made up of strange matter? The magnetic field decay of a pulsar may be able to give us an answer. Since Cooper pairing of quarks occurs inside a sufficiently cold strange star, the strange stellar core is superconducting. In order to compensate for the effect of rotation, different superconducting species inside a rotating strange star try to set up different values of London fields. Thus we have a frustrated system. Using Ginzburg-Landau formalism, I solved the problem of a rotating superconducting strange star: Instead of setting up a global London field, vortex bundles carrying localized magnetic fields are formed. Moreover, the number density of vortex bundles is directly proportional to the angular speed of the star. Since it is energetically favorable for the vortex bundles to pin to magnetic flux tubes, the rotational dynamics and magnetic evolution of a strange star are coupled together, leading to magnetic flux expulsion as the star slows down. I investigate this effect numerically and find that the characteristic field decay time is much less than 20 Myr in all reasonable parameter regions. On the other hand, the characteristic magnetic field decay time for pulsars is ≥ 20 Myr. Thus, my finding casts doubts on the hypothesis that pulsars are strange stars. © 1997. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43192
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.487
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.369
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, HFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:41:02Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:41:02Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAstrophysical Journal Letters, 1997, v. 479 n. 2 PART I, p. 886-901en_HK
dc.identifier.issn2041-8205en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43192-
dc.description.abstractAre pulsars made up of strange matter? The magnetic field decay of a pulsar may be able to give us an answer. Since Cooper pairing of quarks occurs inside a sufficiently cold strange star, the strange stellar core is superconducting. In order to compensate for the effect of rotation, different superconducting species inside a rotating strange star try to set up different values of London fields. Thus we have a frustrated system. Using Ginzburg-Landau formalism, I solved the problem of a rotating superconducting strange star: Instead of setting up a global London field, vortex bundles carrying localized magnetic fields are formed. Moreover, the number density of vortex bundles is directly proportional to the angular speed of the star. Since it is energetically favorable for the vortex bundles to pin to magnetic flux tubes, the rotational dynamics and magnetic evolution of a strange star are coupled together, leading to magnetic flux expulsion as the star slows down. I investigate this effect numerically and find that the characteristic field decay time is much less than 20 Myr in all reasonable parameter regions. On the other hand, the characteristic magnetic field decay time for pulsars is ≥ 20 Myr. Thus, my finding casts doubts on the hypothesis that pulsars are strange stars. © 1997. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.format.extent533936 bytes-
dc.format.extent28160 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInstitute of Physics Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://iopscience.iop.org/2041-8205en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAstrophysical Journal Lettersen_HK
dc.rightsThe Astrophysical Journal. Copyright © University of Chicago Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectDense matteren_HK
dc.subjectMagnetic fieldsen_HK
dc.subjectStars: interiorsen_HK
dc.subjectStars: magnetic fieldsen_HK
dc.subjectStars: rotationen_HK
dc.titleOn the rotation and magnetic field evolution of superconducting strange starsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0004-637X&volume=479&issue=pt 1&spage=886&epage=901&date=1997&atitle=On+the+Rotation+and+Magnetic+Field+Evolution+of+Superconducting+Strange+Starsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChau, HF: hfchau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChau, HF=rp00669en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/303898en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-21744456182en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros22244-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-21744456182&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume479en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2 PART Ien_HK
dc.identifier.spage886en_HK
dc.identifier.epage901en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1997WU50500034-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, HF=7005742276en_HK

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