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Article: Clostridium bacteraemia characterised by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing
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TitleClostridium bacteraemia characterised by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing
 
AuthorsWoo, PCY2
Lau, SKP2
Chan, KM2
Fung, AMY2
Tang, BSF2
Yuen, KY1 2
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcp.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationJournal Of Clinical Pathology, 2005, v. 58 n. 3, p. 301-307 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2004.022830
 
AbstractBackground: Owing to problems in accurate species identification of the diverse genus clostridium, the epidemiology and pathogenicity of many species are not fully understood. Moreover, previous studies on clostridium bacteraemia have been limited and relied only on phenotypic species identification. Aims: To characterise the epidemiology, disease spectrum, and outcome of clostridium bacteraemia using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. Method: During a four year period (1998-2001), all cases of clostridium bacteraemia were prospectively studied and all "non-perfringens" clostridium isolates identified to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results: Fifty one blood culture isolates were identified as Clostridium perfringens and 17 belonged to 11 other clostridium species. The first case of C disporicum infection and two cases of clostridium bacteraemia in children with intussusception were also described. Of the 68 clostridium isolates from 68 different patients, 38 were associated with clinically relevant bacteraemia. The gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tracts were common sites of both underlying disease and portal of entry in these patients. Clostridium perfringens accounted for 79% of all clinically relevant bacteraemia, with the remainder caused by a diversity of species. The attributable mortality rate of clinically relevant clostridium bacteraemia was 299%. Younger age and underlying gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary tract disease were associated with mortality (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients with clinically relevant clostridium bacteraemia should be investigated for the presence of underlying disease processes in the gastrointestinal or hepatobiliary tracts. 16S rRNA gene analysis will continue to be useful in further understanding the pathogenicity of various clostridium species.
 
ISSN0021-9746
2013 Impact Factor: 2.551
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2004.022830
 
PubMed Central IDPMC1770585
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000227691100015
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, KM
 
dc.contributor.authorFung, AMY
 
dc.contributor.authorTang, BSF
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:39:13Z
 
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:39:13Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Owing to problems in accurate species identification of the diverse genus clostridium, the epidemiology and pathogenicity of many species are not fully understood. Moreover, previous studies on clostridium bacteraemia have been limited and relied only on phenotypic species identification. Aims: To characterise the epidemiology, disease spectrum, and outcome of clostridium bacteraemia using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. Method: During a four year period (1998-2001), all cases of clostridium bacteraemia were prospectively studied and all "non-perfringens" clostridium isolates identified to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results: Fifty one blood culture isolates were identified as Clostridium perfringens and 17 belonged to 11 other clostridium species. The first case of C disporicum infection and two cases of clostridium bacteraemia in children with intussusception were also described. Of the 68 clostridium isolates from 68 different patients, 38 were associated with clinically relevant bacteraemia. The gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary tracts were common sites of both underlying disease and portal of entry in these patients. Clostridium perfringens accounted for 79% of all clinically relevant bacteraemia, with the remainder caused by a diversity of species. The attributable mortality rate of clinically relevant clostridium bacteraemia was 299%. Younger age and underlying gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary tract disease were associated with mortality (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Patients with clinically relevant clostridium bacteraemia should be investigated for the presence of underlying disease processes in the gastrointestinal or hepatobiliary tracts. 16S rRNA gene analysis will continue to be useful in further understanding the pathogenicity of various clostridium species.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent108009 bytes
 
dc.format.extent30720 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
 
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Pathology, 2005, v. 58 n. 3, p. 301-307 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2004.022830
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jcp.2004.022830
 
dc.identifier.epage307
 
dc.identifier.hkuros100305
 
dc.identifier.hkuros114665
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227691100015
 
dc.identifier.issn0021-9746
2013 Impact Factor: 2.551
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1770585
 
dc.identifier.pmid15735165
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-15044349638
 
dc.identifier.spage301
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43115
 
dc.identifier.volume58
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcp.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Pathology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of clinical pathology. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshBacteremia - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshClostridium - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
 
dc.subject.meshClostridium infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshRna, bacterial - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshRna, ribosomal, 16s - genetics
 
dc.titleClostridium bacteraemia characterised by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Yuen, KY</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong