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Article: Clonorchiasis in bone marrow transplant recipients

TitleClonorchiasis in bone marrow transplant recipients
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/
Citation
Clinical Infectious Diseases, 1998, v. 27 n. 2, p. 382-384 How to Cite?
AbstractAmong 380 bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients, five cases (1.3%) of clonorchiasis were observed from 1991 to 1996. Clonorchis sinensis infection was evident in the results of stool examinations performed for screening purposes 7 days before bone marrow transplantation. Salmonella species were isolated concomitantly from the stools of two of the five patients. None of the patients had symptoms due to clonorchiasis. Ultrasonography did not show dilated hepatobiliary ducts, stones, or periportal fibrosis. Fatty liver changes were detected in one patient. All five patients received praziquantel (25 mg/kg po t.i.d. for 1 day) before bone marrow transplantation. Only two patients who underwent allogeneic transplantation had mild venoocclusive disease of the liver with transient hyperbilirubinemia and mildly elevated liver enzyme levels, whereas hyperbilirubinemia or elevated serum alanine aminotransferase levels, related to conditioning toxicity, occurred in two other patients. After treatment with praziquantel, stool examinations for all five patients were negative for C. sinensis ova. In addition, Salmonella species were not detected after ciprofloxacin prophylaxis. All five patients survived for >300 days. Given the availability of effective therapy and in the absence of excessive complications, clonorchiasis is not a contraindication to bone marrow transplantation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43086
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.736
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.742
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLie, AKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiang, RHSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:38:33Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:38:33Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Infectious Diseases, 1998, v. 27 n. 2, p. 382-384en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43086-
dc.description.abstractAmong 380 bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients, five cases (1.3%) of clonorchiasis were observed from 1991 to 1996. Clonorchis sinensis infection was evident in the results of stool examinations performed for screening purposes 7 days before bone marrow transplantation. Salmonella species were isolated concomitantly from the stools of two of the five patients. None of the patients had symptoms due to clonorchiasis. Ultrasonography did not show dilated hepatobiliary ducts, stones, or periportal fibrosis. Fatty liver changes were detected in one patient. All five patients received praziquantel (25 mg/kg po t.i.d. for 1 day) before bone marrow transplantation. Only two patients who underwent allogeneic transplantation had mild venoocclusive disease of the liver with transient hyperbilirubinemia and mildly elevated liver enzyme levels, whereas hyperbilirubinemia or elevated serum alanine aminotransferase levels, related to conditioning toxicity, occurred in two other patients. After treatment with praziquantel, stool examinations for all five patients were negative for C. sinensis ova. In addition, Salmonella species were not detected after ciprofloxacin prophylaxis. All five patients survived for >300 days. Given the availability of effective therapy and in the absence of excessive complications, clonorchiasis is not a contraindication to bone marrow transplantation.en_HK
dc.format.extent137801 bytes-
dc.format.extent30720 bytes-
dc.format.extent3198 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsClinical Infectious Diseases. Copyright © University of Chicago Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshLiver function testsen_HK
dc.subject.meshClonorchiasisen_HK
dc.subject.meshBone marrow transplantationen_HK
dc.subject.meshTransplantation immunologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle ageden_HK
dc.titleClonorchiasis in bone marrow transplant recipientsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1058-4838&volume=27&issue=2&spage=382&epage=384&date=1998&atitle=Clonorchiasis+in+bone+marrow+transplant+recipientsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SSY:samsonsy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiang, RHS:rliang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SSY=rp00395en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, RHS=rp00345en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid9709891en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031905096en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros37701-
dc.identifier.volume27en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage382en_HK
dc.identifier.epage384en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000075285400023-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLie, AKW=24284842400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SSY=13310021400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, CK=7410162028en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, RHS=26643224900en_HK

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