File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Conference Paper: A photochemical crosslinking technology for tissue engineering - Enhancement of the physico-chemical properties of collagen-based scaffolds

TitleA photochemical crosslinking technology for tissue engineering - Enhancement of the physico-chemical properties of collagen-based scaffolds
Authors
KeywordsCollagen
Photochemical crosslinking
Physicochemical properties
Issue Date2005
PublisherS P I E - International Society for Optical Engineering. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spie.org/app/Publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=proceedings
Citation
Progress In Biomedical Optics And Imaging - Proceedings Of Spie, 2005, v. 5695, p. 317-327 How to Cite?
AbstractCollagen gel is a natural biomaterial commonly used in tissue engineering because of its close resemblance to nature, negligible immunogenecity and excellent biocompatibility. However, unprocessed collagen gel is mechanically weak, highly water binding and vulnerable to chemical and enzymatic attacks that limits its use in tissue engineering in particular tissues for weight-bearing purposes. The current project aimed to strengthen and stabilize collagen scaffolds using a photochemical crosslinking technique. Photochemical crosslinking is rapid, efficient, non-thermal and does not involve toxic chemicals, comparing with other crosslinking methods such as glutaraldehyde and gamma irradiation. Collagen scaffolds were fabricated using rat-tail tendon collagen. An argon laser was used to process the collagen gel after equilibrating with a photosensitizing reagent. Scanning electronic microscope was used to characterize the surface and cross-sectional morphology of the membranes. Physico-chemical properties of the collagen scaffolds such as water-binding capacity, mechanical properties and thermostability were studied. Photochemical crosslinking significantly reduced the water-binding capacity, a parameter inversely proportional to the extent of crosslinking, of collagen scaffolds. Photochemical crosslinking also significantly increased the ultimate stress and tangent modulus at 90% of the rupture strain of the collagen scaffolds. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed a significantly higher shrinkage temperature and absence of the denaturation peak during the thermoscan comparing with the controls. This means greater thermostability in the photochemically crosslinked collagen scaffolds. This study demonstrates that the photochemical crosslinking technology is able to enhance the physicochemical properties of collagen scaffolds by strengthening, stabilizing and controlling the swelling ratio of the collagen scaffolds so as to enable their use for tissue engineering.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43005
ISSN
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, BPen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:36:43Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:36:43Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationProgress In Biomedical Optics And Imaging - Proceedings Of Spie, 2005, v. 5695, p. 317-327en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1605-7422en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43005-
dc.description.abstractCollagen gel is a natural biomaterial commonly used in tissue engineering because of its close resemblance to nature, negligible immunogenecity and excellent biocompatibility. However, unprocessed collagen gel is mechanically weak, highly water binding and vulnerable to chemical and enzymatic attacks that limits its use in tissue engineering in particular tissues for weight-bearing purposes. The current project aimed to strengthen and stabilize collagen scaffolds using a photochemical crosslinking technique. Photochemical crosslinking is rapid, efficient, non-thermal and does not involve toxic chemicals, comparing with other crosslinking methods such as glutaraldehyde and gamma irradiation. Collagen scaffolds were fabricated using rat-tail tendon collagen. An argon laser was used to process the collagen gel after equilibrating with a photosensitizing reagent. Scanning electronic microscope was used to characterize the surface and cross-sectional morphology of the membranes. Physico-chemical properties of the collagen scaffolds such as water-binding capacity, mechanical properties and thermostability were studied. Photochemical crosslinking significantly reduced the water-binding capacity, a parameter inversely proportional to the extent of crosslinking, of collagen scaffolds. Photochemical crosslinking also significantly increased the ultimate stress and tangent modulus at 90% of the rupture strain of the collagen scaffolds. Differential scanning calorimetry analysis showed a significantly higher shrinkage temperature and absence of the denaturation peak during the thermoscan comparing with the controls. This means greater thermostability in the photochemically crosslinked collagen scaffolds. This study demonstrates that the photochemical crosslinking technology is able to enhance the physicochemical properties of collagen scaffolds by strengthening, stabilizing and controlling the swelling ratio of the collagen scaffolds so as to enable their use for tissue engineering.en_HK
dc.format.extent568734 bytes-
dc.format.extent25600 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherS P I E - International Society for Optical Engineering. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spie.org/app/Publications/index.cfm?fuseaction=proceedingsen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIEen_HK
dc.rightsCopyright 2005 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. This paper was published in S P I E - the International Society for Optical Proceedings, 2005, v. 5695, p. 317-327 and is made available as an electronic reprint with permission of SPIE. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic or multiple reproduction, distribution to multiple locations via electronic or other means, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCollagenen_HK
dc.subjectPhotochemical crosslinkingen_HK
dc.subjectPhysicochemical propertiesen_HK
dc.titleA photochemical crosslinking technology for tissue engineering - Enhancement of the physico-chemical properties of collagen-based scaffoldsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0277-786X&volume=5695&spage=317&epage=327&date=2005&atitle=Photochemical+crosslinking+technology+for+tissue+engineering:+enhancement+of+the+physico-chemical+properties+of+collagen-based+scaffoldsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, BP:bpchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, BP=rp00087en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.597159en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-23244442032en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros100432-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-23244442032&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume5695en_HK
dc.identifier.spage317en_HK
dc.identifier.epage327en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, BP=7201530390en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats