File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Transmit-power reduction for class-1 Bluetooth-enabled indoor cordless phones

TitleTransmit-power reduction for class-1 Bluetooth-enabled indoor cordless phones
Authors
KeywordsBluetooth
Indoor cordless phones
Transmit power
Issue Date2002
PublisherIEEE.
Citation
Ieee Transactions On Consumer Electronics, 2002, v. 48 n. 4, p. 1038-1045 How to Cite?
AbstractClass-1 Bluetooth devices support a transmission range of about 100m and are useful for indoor cordless telephony with advantages of wider coverage, greater user mobility, and more convenience. To minimize the transmit power of class-1 devices, feedback power control specified in the Bluetooth specification can be used. This paper shows that further transmit-power reduction is possible by reducing the Golden Receive Power Range (GRPR) from the specified value of 20dB. For typical indoor log-normal-shadowing channels, more than 4dB reduction in the mean transmit power can usually be obtained by reducing the GRPR to 10dB. However, using a smaller GRPR increases the frequency of making power-adjustment requests through the Link Manager Protocol (LMP), thereby pre-empting more voice packets and affecting the voice quality. We compute the overhead cost due to power control, defined as the percentage of the total number of packets used for power-adjustment requests, when the GRPR is set at 10dB ± 6dB, wherein 6dB is the tolerance allowed in implementation. It is found that the overhead cost is less than about 1% but becomes close to 1% as the GRPR approaches 4dB, indicating that the link performance would become barely acceptable for voice transmission in some situations. We also consider utilizing the reserved byte in LMP power-control commands to convey the preferred number of power-adjustment steps to the transmitter in order to reduce the overhead cost. With this arrangement, the (worst-case) overhead cost is reduced to about 0.3%, so that the voice quality can be maintained acceptable even if the GRPR is reduced to 10dB ± 6dB for transmit-power reduction.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42931
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.12
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.732
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, TSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:34:57Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:34:57Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationIeee Transactions On Consumer Electronics, 2002, v. 48 n. 4, p. 1038-1045en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0098-3063en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42931-
dc.description.abstractClass-1 Bluetooth devices support a transmission range of about 100m and are useful for indoor cordless telephony with advantages of wider coverage, greater user mobility, and more convenience. To minimize the transmit power of class-1 devices, feedback power control specified in the Bluetooth specification can be used. This paper shows that further transmit-power reduction is possible by reducing the Golden Receive Power Range (GRPR) from the specified value of 20dB. For typical indoor log-normal-shadowing channels, more than 4dB reduction in the mean transmit power can usually be obtained by reducing the GRPR to 10dB. However, using a smaller GRPR increases the frequency of making power-adjustment requests through the Link Manager Protocol (LMP), thereby pre-empting more voice packets and affecting the voice quality. We compute the overhead cost due to power control, defined as the percentage of the total number of packets used for power-adjustment requests, when the GRPR is set at 10dB ± 6dB, wherein 6dB is the tolerance allowed in implementation. It is found that the overhead cost is less than about 1% but becomes close to 1% as the GRPR approaches 4dB, indicating that the link performance would become barely acceptable for voice transmission in some situations. We also consider utilizing the reserved byte in LMP power-control commands to convey the preferred number of power-adjustment steps to the transmitter in order to reduce the overhead cost. With this arrangement, the (worst-case) overhead cost is reduced to about 0.3%, so that the voice quality can be maintained acceptable even if the GRPR is reduced to 10dB ± 6dB for transmit-power reduction.en_HK
dc.format.extent463136 bytes-
dc.format.extent8772 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherIEEE.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronicsen_HK
dc.rights©2002 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBluetoothen_HK
dc.subjectIndoor cordless phonesen_HK
dc.subjectTransmit poweren_HK
dc.titleTransmit-power reduction for class-1 Bluetooth-enabled indoor cordless phonesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0098-3063&volume=48&issue=4&spage=1038&epage=1045&date=2002&atitle=Transmit-power+reduction+for+class-1+Bluetooth-enabled+indoor+cordless+phonesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNg, TS:tsng@eee.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNg, TS=rp00159en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/TCE.2003.1196436en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036878884en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros81498-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036878884&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume48en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1038en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1045en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, KW=7101909909en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, TS=7402229975en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats