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Article: Longitudinal assessment of community psychobehavioral responses during and after the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong

TitleLongitudinal assessment of community psychobehavioral responses during and after the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/
Citation
Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2005, v. 40 n. 12, p. 1713-1720 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. In previous literature, the stability and temporal evolution of psychobehavioral responses to an outbreak remained undefined, because of the exclusively cross-sectional nature of such study designs. Methods. Using random-digit dialing, we sampled 4481 Hong Kong residents in 6 population-based surveys that were conducted at different times during and after the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Results. Respondents' State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score (range, 10-40) showed a decreasing temporal trend, from a high mean value of 24.8 during the peak of the Amoy Gardens outbreak to a postepidemic mean baseline value of 14.5. Those who perceived a higher likelihood of contracting or dying of SARS had significantly higher anxiety scores. Female respondents, individuals aged 30-49 years, and individuals with only a primary education or less were predisposed to greater anxiety. There was a positive dose-response gradient between anxiety level and uptake of personal protective measures. Males respondents, individuals at the extremes of age, and individuals with lower educational levels were less likely to engage in self-protective behavior. The presence of symptoms was the only consistent predictor for greater use of health services. There was remarkable stability in the magnitude and the direction of associations between predictors and outcomes over time. Conclusions. Our findings can assist in modifying public service announcements in the future, which should be tailored to psychobehavioral surveillance intelligence to achieve the desired behavioral outcomes. Future research should explore the use of more-sophisticated techniques, including structural equation modeling and game-theoretical frameworks, to analyze population psychology and behavior, and it should integrate such findings with transmission dynamics modeling. © 2005 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42536
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.736
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.742
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaconShone, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChoy, RYLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-29T08:52:27Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-29T08:52:27Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Infectious Diseases, 2005, v. 40 n. 12, p. 1713-1720en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42536-
dc.description.abstractBackground. In previous literature, the stability and temporal evolution of psychobehavioral responses to an outbreak remained undefined, because of the exclusively cross-sectional nature of such study designs. Methods. Using random-digit dialing, we sampled 4481 Hong Kong residents in 6 population-based surveys that were conducted at different times during and after the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Results. Respondents' State-Trait Anxiety Inventory score (range, 10-40) showed a decreasing temporal trend, from a high mean value of 24.8 during the peak of the Amoy Gardens outbreak to a postepidemic mean baseline value of 14.5. Those who perceived a higher likelihood of contracting or dying of SARS had significantly higher anxiety scores. Female respondents, individuals aged 30-49 years, and individuals with only a primary education or less were predisposed to greater anxiety. There was a positive dose-response gradient between anxiety level and uptake of personal protective measures. Males respondents, individuals at the extremes of age, and individuals with lower educational levels were less likely to engage in self-protective behavior. The presence of symptoms was the only consistent predictor for greater use of health services. There was remarkable stability in the magnitude and the direction of associations between predictors and outcomes over time. Conclusions. Our findings can assist in modifying public service announcements in the future, which should be tailored to psychobehavioral surveillance intelligence to achieve the desired behavioral outcomes. Future research should explore the use of more-sophisticated techniques, including structural equation modeling and game-theoretical frameworks, to analyze population psychology and behavior, and it should integrate such findings with transmission dynamics modeling. © 2005 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.format.extent133142 bytes-
dc.format.extent413660 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.rightsClinical Infectious Diseases. Copyright © University of Chicago Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshDisease outbreaksen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnxiety - epidemiology - psychologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHealth knowledge, attitudes, practiceen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSevere acute respiratory syndromeen_HK
dc.titleLongitudinal assessment of community psychobehavioral responses during and after the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1058-4838&volume=40&issue=12&spage=1713&epage=1720&date=2005&atitle=Longitudinal+assessment+of+community+psychobehavioral+responses+during+and+after+the+2003+outbreak+of+severe+acute+respiratory+syndrome+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM: lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailBaconShone, J: johnbs@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ: hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBaconShone, J=rp00056en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/429923en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15909256-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-20444411922en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros98107-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-20444411922&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue12en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1713en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1720en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229204300001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SKK=24472757900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SY=7403716884en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaconShone, J=6602137416en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChoy, RYL=8607420100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_HK

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