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Article: Aborigines and Crime in Australia

TitleAborigines and Crime in Australia
Authors
KeywordsCriminology and law enforcement
Issue Date1997
PublisherUniversity of Chicago Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CJ/home.html
Citation
Crime and Justice: A Review of Research, 1997, v. 21, p. 407-468 How to Cite?
Abstract
Aborigines are 16 times more likely in Western Australia to be victims of homicide and 6.5 times more likely to report crimes against die person to police than are non-Aborigines. Aborigines are 9.2 times more likely to be arrested, 6.2 times more likely to be imprisoned by lower courts, 23.7 times more likely to be imprisoned as an adult, and 48 times more likely to be imprisoned as juveniles than non-Aborigines. The increased overrepresentation from arrest to imprisonment appears largely a function of the very high levels of recidivism found among Aborigines: 88 percent of male Aborigines are rearrested compared with 52 percent of non-Aborigines, and 75 percent of Aborigines return to prison at least once compared with 43 percent of non-Aboriginal males. States with a high Aboriginal 'cultural strength' and socioeconomic 'stress' index are the most punitive. 'Cultural strength,' 'stress,' and imprisonment are highly correlated and associated with those states with the most 'frontier' characteristics.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42514
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 0.684
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.812

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBroadhurst, RGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-29T08:51:40Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-29T08:51:40Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCrime and Justice: A Review of Research, 1997, v. 21, p. 407-468en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0192-3234en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42514-
dc.description.abstractAborigines are 16 times more likely in Western Australia to be victims of homicide and 6.5 times more likely to report crimes against die person to police than are non-Aborigines. Aborigines are 9.2 times more likely to be arrested, 6.2 times more likely to be imprisoned by lower courts, 23.7 times more likely to be imprisoned as an adult, and 48 times more likely to be imprisoned as juveniles than non-Aborigines. The increased overrepresentation from arrest to imprisonment appears largely a function of the very high levels of recidivism found among Aborigines: 88 percent of male Aborigines are rearrested compared with 52 percent of non-Aborigines, and 75 percent of Aborigines return to prison at least once compared with 43 percent of non-Aboriginal males. States with a high Aboriginal 'cultural strength' and socioeconomic 'stress' index are the most punitive. 'Cultural strength,' 'stress,' and imprisonment are highly correlated and associated with those states with the most 'frontier' characteristics.en_HK
dc.format.extent3880427 bytes-
dc.format.extent26624 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CJ/home.htmlen_HK
dc.rightsCrime and Justice: A Review of Research. Copyright © University of Chicago Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCriminology and law enforcementen_HK
dc.titleAborigines and Crime in Australiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0192-3234&volume=21&spage=407&epage=468&date=1997&atitle=Aborigines+and+Crime+in+Australiaen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros42392-

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