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Article: "I can put the medicine in his soup, Doctor!"
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Title"I can put the medicine in his soup, Doctor!"
 
AuthorsWong, JGWS1
Poon, Y2
Hui, EC1
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jme.bmjjournals.com/
 
CitationJournal Of Medical Ethics, 2005, v. 31 n. 5, p. 262-265 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.2003.007336
 
AbstractThe practice of covertly administering medication is controversial. Although condemned by some as overly paternalistic, others have suggested that it may be acceptable if patients have permanent mental incapacity and refuse needed treatment. Ethical, legal, and clinical considerations become more complex when the mental incapacity is temporary and when the medication actually serves to restore autonomy. We discuss these issues in the context of a young man with schizophrenia. His mother had been giving him antipsychotic medication covertly in his soup. Should the doctor continue to provide a prescription, thus allowing this to continue? We discuss this case based on the "four principles" ethical framework, addressing the conflict between autonomy and beneficence/non-maleficence, the role of antipsychotics as an autonomy restoring agent, truth telling and the balance between individual versus family autonomy.
 
ISSN0306-6800
2012 Impact Factor: 1.419
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.634
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.2003.007336
 
PubMed Central IDPMC1734145
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000228806100004
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWong, JGWS
 
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorHui, EC
 
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-29T08:51:37Z
 
dc.date.available2007-01-29T08:51:37Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractThe practice of covertly administering medication is controversial. Although condemned by some as overly paternalistic, others have suggested that it may be acceptable if patients have permanent mental incapacity and refuse needed treatment. Ethical, legal, and clinical considerations become more complex when the mental incapacity is temporary and when the medication actually serves to restore autonomy. We discuss these issues in the context of a young man with schizophrenia. His mother had been giving him antipsychotic medication covertly in his soup. Should the doctor continue to provide a prescription, thus allowing this to continue? We discuss this case based on the "four principles" ethical framework, addressing the conflict between autonomy and beneficence/non-maleficence, the role of antipsychotics as an autonomy restoring agent, truth telling and the balance between individual versus family autonomy.
 
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version
 
dc.format.extent68888 bytes
 
dc.format.extent26112 bytes
 
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
 
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Ethics, 2005, v. 31 n. 5, p. 262-265 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.2003.007336
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.2003.007336
 
dc.identifier.epage265
 
dc.identifier.hkuros97826
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228806100004
 
dc.identifier.issn0306-6800
2012 Impact Factor: 1.419
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.634
 
dc.identifier.issue5
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1734145
 
dc.identifier.pmid15863680
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-18844434914
 
dc.identifier.spage262
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42513
 
dc.identifier.volume31
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jme.bmjjournals.com/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Ethics
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsJournal of Medical Ethics. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.
 
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License
 
dc.subject.meshAntipsychotic agents - administration & dosage
 
dc.subject.meshEthics, medical
 
dc.subject.meshFood
 
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia - drug therapy
 
dc.subject.meshPhysician-patient relations
 
dc.title"I can put the medicine in his soup, Doctor!"
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong