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Article: Hegemony and socialisation of the mass public: the case of postwar Japan's cooperation with the United States on China policy

TitleHegemony and socialisation of the mass public: the case of postwar Japan's cooperation with the United States on China policy
Authors
KeywordsPolitical science
International relations
Issue Date2003
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=RIS
Citation
Review of International Studies, 2003, v. 29 n. 1, p. 99-119 How to Cite?
AbstractThe constructivism-inspired study on hegemony focuses on the dominant state's ability to shape the beliefs and values of ruling elites in secondary states as a basis of hegemony while paying less attention to the attitude of the mass public in secondary states toward hegemony and the effects of its ‘socialisation’ with hegemonic ideas. This article provides a conceptual framework for studying the relations between hegemony and the mass-public of secondary states and then subjecting it to a preliminary test against postwar Japan's cooperation with the United States on China policy. The main argument of this article is that hegemony may be strengthened and maintained if the mass public of secondary states is socialised with hegemonic conceptions of world order, state identities and underlying ideologies, and acquires an independent constraint on hegemony. The mass public's socialisation with hegemonic ideas, which amounts to a cultural transformation in secondary states, may take place as a result of propagation by the dominant state and secondary state elites, or as a result of important international and domestic events caused by the hegemon, and then come to feed back on the political structures and processes of secondary states in ways conducive to the maintenance of hegemony. When hegemonic ideas are firmly embedded in the security culture of secondary states, ruling elites in those states may cooperate with the hegemon because they themselves genuinely embrace hegemonic ideas. More importantly, some ruling elites may cooperate with the hegemon out of political expediency as the hegemon-induced cultural transformation may change political structures and processes in such ways as to link the ruling elites' political legitimacy closely with secondary states' continued support for hegemony.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42507
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.140
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, QKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-29T08:51:25Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-29T08:51:25Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationReview of International Studies, 2003, v. 29 n. 1, p. 99-119en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0260-2105en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42507-
dc.description.abstractThe constructivism-inspired study on hegemony focuses on the dominant state's ability to shape the beliefs and values of ruling elites in secondary states as a basis of hegemony while paying less attention to the attitude of the mass public in secondary states toward hegemony and the effects of its ‘socialisation’ with hegemonic ideas. This article provides a conceptual framework for studying the relations between hegemony and the mass-public of secondary states and then subjecting it to a preliminary test against postwar Japan's cooperation with the United States on China policy. The main argument of this article is that hegemony may be strengthened and maintained if the mass public of secondary states is socialised with hegemonic conceptions of world order, state identities and underlying ideologies, and acquires an independent constraint on hegemony. The mass public's socialisation with hegemonic ideas, which amounts to a cultural transformation in secondary states, may take place as a result of propagation by the dominant state and secondary state elites, or as a result of important international and domestic events caused by the hegemon, and then come to feed back on the political structures and processes of secondary states in ways conducive to the maintenance of hegemony. When hegemonic ideas are firmly embedded in the security culture of secondary states, ruling elites in those states may cooperate with the hegemon because they themselves genuinely embrace hegemonic ideas. More importantly, some ruling elites may cooperate with the hegemon out of political expediency as the hegemon-induced cultural transformation may change political structures and processes in such ways as to link the ruling elites' political legitimacy closely with secondary states' continued support for hegemony.en_HK
dc.format.extent114435 bytes-
dc.format.extent25600 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=RISen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsReview of International Studies. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectPolitical scienceen_HK
dc.subjectInternational relationsen_HK
dc.titleHegemony and socialisation of the mass public: the case of postwar Japan's cooperation with the United States on China policyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0260-2105&volume=29&issue=1&spage=99&epage=119&date=2003&atitle=Hegemony+and+socialisation+of+the+mass+public:+the+case+of+postwar+Japan%27s+cooperation+with+the+United+States+on+China+policyen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0260210503000068en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037251123-
dc.identifier.hkuros81977-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182232300006-

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