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Article: The sugar composition of fruits in the diet of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in tropical humid forest in Costa Rica

TitleThe sugar composition of fruits in the diet of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in tropical humid forest in Costa Rica
Authors
KeywordsFrugivorous primates
Fruit sugar composition
Seed dispersal syndromes
Spider monkeys
Sugar preferences
Issue Date2003
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TRO
Citation
Journal of Tropical Ecology, 2003, v. 19 n. 6, p. 709-716 How to Cite?
AbstractSpider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) detect sucrose at a threshold lower than any primate yet tested and prefer sucrose to glucose or fructose in laboratory tests. This preferential selection of sucrose led to the hypothesis that such acute discrimination is related to a diet of sucrose-rich fruits. Furthermore, it has been suggested that fruit sugars may be related to distinct guilds of vertebrate seed-dispersers. The objectives of this study were: (1) to test if spider monkeys select sucrose-rich fruits both within and among plant species and (2) to test the hypothesis that sugar concentration is related to bird, bat or monkey seed-dispersal syndromes. Data were collected from one troop of spider monkeys in south-western Costa Rica. Interspecific comparison of ingested fruits shows that spider monkeys consumed species with significantly higher concentrations of glucose and fructose than sucrose. Similarly, at the intraspecific level, food-fruits had significantly more fructose and glucose than non-food fruits, but no difference was found for sucrose. The three different sugar types were not correlated with the importance of the species in the diet based on the amount of time they spent consuming each species. Although sucrose concentrations were significantly higher in primate-dispersed species compared with those dispersed by other vertebrates, soluble carbohydrates in primate-dispersed fruits were principally composed of glucose and fructose. Neither fructose nor glucose concentrations showed significant differences across the three categories of seed dispersal.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42336
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.975
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.569
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRiba-Hernandez, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStoner, KEen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLucas, PWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-29T08:47:11Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-29T08:47:11Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Tropical Ecology, 2003, v. 19 n. 6, p. 709-716en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0266-4674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42336-
dc.description.abstractSpider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) detect sucrose at a threshold lower than any primate yet tested and prefer sucrose to glucose or fructose in laboratory tests. This preferential selection of sucrose led to the hypothesis that such acute discrimination is related to a diet of sucrose-rich fruits. Furthermore, it has been suggested that fruit sugars may be related to distinct guilds of vertebrate seed-dispersers. The objectives of this study were: (1) to test if spider monkeys select sucrose-rich fruits both within and among plant species and (2) to test the hypothesis that sugar concentration is related to bird, bat or monkey seed-dispersal syndromes. Data were collected from one troop of spider monkeys in south-western Costa Rica. Interspecific comparison of ingested fruits shows that spider monkeys consumed species with significantly higher concentrations of glucose and fructose than sucrose. Similarly, at the intraspecific level, food-fruits had significantly more fructose and glucose than non-food fruits, but no difference was found for sucrose. The three different sugar types were not correlated with the importance of the species in the diet based on the amount of time they spent consuming each species. Although sucrose concentrations were significantly higher in primate-dispersed species compared with those dispersed by other vertebrates, soluble carbohydrates in primate-dispersed fruits were principally composed of glucose and fructose. Neither fructose nor glucose concentrations showed significant differences across the three categories of seed dispersal.en_HK
dc.format.extent95788 bytes-
dc.format.extent25088 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TROen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Tropical Ecology. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectFrugivorous primatesen_HK
dc.subjectFruit sugar compositionen_HK
dc.subjectSeed dispersal syndromesen_HK
dc.subjectSpider monkeysen_HK
dc.subjectSugar preferencesen_HK
dc.titleThe sugar composition of fruits in the diet of spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) in tropical humid forest in Costa Ricaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0266-4674&volume=19&issue=6&spage=709&epage=716&date=2003&atitle=The+sugar+composition+of+fruits+in+the+diet+of+spider+monkeys+(Ateles+geoffroyi)+in+tropical+humid+forest+in+Costa+Ricaen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0266467403006102en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros85069-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000186710800010-

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