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Article: Bad and banned language: triad secret societies, the censorship of the Cantonese vernacular, and colonial language policy in Hong Kong

TitleBad and banned language: triad secret societies, the censorship of the Cantonese vernacular, and colonial language policy in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsLinguistics
Issue Date1995
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=LSY
Citation
Language in Society, 1995, v. 24 n. 2, p. 159-186 How to Cite?
AbstractThe language of Chinese secret societies ('triads') in Hong Kong can be studied by relating triad language to anti-languages, to taboo language, and to the status of the vernacular in sociolinguistic theory. Also examined here are the laws in Hong Kong concerning triad language, and the attitudes of government agencies charged with policing the media. One striking feature of the Hong Kong situation is that the use of triad jargon can in some circumstances constitute a serious criminal offense. However, triad language also appears to be a source of innovation, through the popular media, into mainstream Hong Kong Cantonese. Research on triad language is relevant to the relationship between colonialism and language control.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42331
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.525
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.034

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBolton, KRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHutton, CMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-29T08:46:58Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-29T08:46:58Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLanguage in Society, 1995, v. 24 n. 2, p. 159-186en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0047-4045en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42331-
dc.description.abstractThe language of Chinese secret societies ('triads') in Hong Kong can be studied by relating triad language to anti-languages, to taboo language, and to the status of the vernacular in sociolinguistic theory. Also examined here are the laws in Hong Kong concerning triad language, and the attitudes of government agencies charged with policing the media. One striking feature of the Hong Kong situation is that the use of triad jargon can in some circumstances constitute a serious criminal offense. However, triad language also appears to be a source of innovation, through the popular media, into mainstream Hong Kong Cantonese. Research on triad language is relevant to the relationship between colonialism and language control.en_HK
dc.format.extent9759774 bytes-
dc.format.extent2099 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=LSYen_HK
dc.rightsLanguage in Society. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLinguisticsen_HK
dc.titleBad and banned language: triad secret societies, the censorship of the Cantonese vernacular, and colonial language policy in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0047-4045&volume=24&issue=2&spage=159&epage=186&date=1995&atitle=Bad+and+banned+language:+triad+secret+societies,+the+censorship+of+the+Cantonese+vernacular,+and+colonial+language+policy+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0047404500018571-
dc.identifier.hkuros15220-

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