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Article: Women and Health in China: Anatomy, Destiny and Politics

TitleWomen and Health in China: Anatomy, Destiny and Politics
Authors
KeywordsSocial services and welfare
Issue Date1996
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JSP
Citation
Journal of Social Policy, 1996, v. 25 n. 4, p. 529-543 How to Cite?
AbstractA number of circumstances have combined in the reform era in China to put women at a more disadvantageous position now than at any other time since 1949. Some of them reflect age-old prejudices, others are the result of the economic reforms, but the two join in a synthesis to threaten women’s improved status. Health factors that have particularly impinged on women include: the one-child policy and the skewed birth ratio in favour of boys that this has led to; very clear problems in the area of mental health, including a suicide rate which is much higher for women that for men; kidnapping; and life-threatening exploitation in the new special economic zones. The government’s desire to control women’s fertility, however, has led to a marked improvement and increase in maternity and childcare health services in the last ten years. The central government has lost power to the provinces and is no longer able to take decisive action to protect women from the effects of discrimination.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42251
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.151
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.970

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPearson, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-08T02:32:36Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-08T02:32:36Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Social Policy, 1996, v. 25 n. 4, p. 529-543en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0047-2794en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42251-
dc.description.abstractA number of circumstances have combined in the reform era in China to put women at a more disadvantageous position now than at any other time since 1949. Some of them reflect age-old prejudices, others are the result of the economic reforms, but the two join in a synthesis to threaten women’s improved status. Health factors that have particularly impinged on women include: the one-child policy and the skewed birth ratio in favour of boys that this has led to; very clear problems in the area of mental health, including a suicide rate which is much higher for women that for men; kidnapping; and life-threatening exploitation in the new special economic zones. The government’s desire to control women’s fertility, however, has led to a marked improvement and increase in maternity and childcare health services in the last ten years. The central government has lost power to the provinces and is no longer able to take decisive action to protect women from the effects of discrimination.en_HK
dc.format.extent7269195 bytes-
dc.format.extent25600 bytes-
dc.format.extent409839 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=JSPen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Social Policy. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectSocial services and welfareen_HK
dc.titleWomen and Health in China: Anatomy, Destiny and Politicsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0047-2794&volume=25&issue=4&spage=529&epage=543&date=1996&atitle=Women+and+Health+in+China:+Anatomy,+Destiny+and+Politicsen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030430865-
dc.identifier.hkuros26781-

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