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Article: Potential for transmission of avian influenza viruses to pigs

TitlePotential for transmission of avian influenza viruses to pigs
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://vir.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal of General Virology, 1994, v. 75 n. pt 9, p. 2183-2188 How to Cite?
AbstractPandemic strains of influenza A virus arise by genetic reassortment between avian and human viruses. Pigs have been suggested to generate such reassortants as intermediate hosts. In order for pigs to serve as 'mixing vessels' in genetic reassortment events, they must be susceptible to both human and avian influenza viruses. The ability of avian influenza viruses to replicate in pigs, however, has not been examined comprehensively. In this study, we assessed the growth potential of 42 strains of influenza virus in pigs. Of these, 38 were avian strains, including 27 with non-human-type haemagglutinins (HA; H4 to H13). At least one strain of each HA subtype replicated in the respiratory tract of pigs for 5 to 7 days to a level equivalent to that of swine and human viruses. These results indicate that avian influenza viruses with or without non-human-type HAs can be transmitted to pigs, thus raising the possibility of introduction of their genes into humans. Sera from pigs infected with avian viruses showed high titres of antibodies in ELISA and neutralization tests, but did not inhibit haemagglutination of homologous viruses, cautioning against the use of haemagglutination-inhibition tests to identify pigs infected with avian influenza viruses. Co-infection of pigs with a swine virus and with an avian virus unable to replicate in this animal generated reassortant viruses, whose polymerase and HA genes were entirely of avian origin, that could be passaged in pigs. This finding indicates that even avian viruses that do not replicate in pigs can contribute genes in the generation of reassortants.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42162
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.192
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.741
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKida, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorIto, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorYasuda, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShimizu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorItakura, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShortridge, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKawaoka, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-08T02:30:36Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-08T02:30:36Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of General Virology, 1994, v. 75 n. pt 9, p. 2183-2188en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-1317en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42162-
dc.description.abstractPandemic strains of influenza A virus arise by genetic reassortment between avian and human viruses. Pigs have been suggested to generate such reassortants as intermediate hosts. In order for pigs to serve as 'mixing vessels' in genetic reassortment events, they must be susceptible to both human and avian influenza viruses. The ability of avian influenza viruses to replicate in pigs, however, has not been examined comprehensively. In this study, we assessed the growth potential of 42 strains of influenza virus in pigs. Of these, 38 were avian strains, including 27 with non-human-type haemagglutinins (HA; H4 to H13). At least one strain of each HA subtype replicated in the respiratory tract of pigs for 5 to 7 days to a level equivalent to that of swine and human viruses. These results indicate that avian influenza viruses with or without non-human-type HAs can be transmitted to pigs, thus raising the possibility of introduction of their genes into humans. Sera from pigs infected with avian viruses showed high titres of antibodies in ELISA and neutralization tests, but did not inhibit haemagglutination of homologous viruses, cautioning against the use of haemagglutination-inhibition tests to identify pigs infected with avian influenza viruses. Co-infection of pigs with a swine virus and with an avian virus unable to replicate in this animal generated reassortant viruses, whose polymerase and HA genes were entirely of avian origin, that could be passaged in pigs. This finding indicates that even avian viruses that do not replicate in pigs can contribute genes in the generation of reassortants.en_HK
dc.format.extent6634989 bytes-
dc.format.extent363 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://vir.sgmjournals.orgen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, viral - blooden_HK
dc.subject.meshChick embryoen_HK
dc.subject.meshComparative studyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease susceptibilityen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnzyme-linked immunosorbent assayen_HK
dc.titlePotential for transmission of avian influenza viruses to pigsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-1317&volume=75&issue=pt 9&spage=2183&epage=2188&date=1994&atitle=Potential+for+transmission+of+avian+influenza+viruses+to+pigsen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid8077918-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028104105-
dc.identifier.hkuros4312-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994PF54300006-

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