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Article: Korea, China, and Western Barbarians: Diplomacy in Early Nineteenth-Century Korea

TitleKorea, China, and Western Barbarians: Diplomacy in Early Nineteenth-Century Korea
Authors
KeywordsAsian studies political science
Issue Date1998
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASS
Citation
Modern Asian Studies, 1998, v. 32 n. 2, p. 389-430 How to Cite?
AbstractThe story of the ‘opening’ of Korea presents us with a peculiar problem of its own. For, when Westerners arrived on the shores of Korea in the nineteenth century, they found a country that was shielded in the shadow of China. Korea, so it seemed to Westerners, would not open the country without Chinese approval, but China would not interfere in Korea on Western countries' behalf or, at times, even on her own behalf. And both Korea and China professed that they were acting according to the dictates of the traditional relationship which had bound the two countries for many centuries in peace and harmony. To Western observers this traditional Sino-Korean relationship seemed to offer nothing but a diplomatic cul-de-sac. Under the circumstances, it is not surprising that Western diplomats concluded that this relationship was merely ceremonial and largely dismissed it as having little political consequence.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42121
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.405
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.332
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHara, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-08T02:29:31Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-08T02:29:31Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationModern Asian Studies, 1998, v. 32 n. 2, p. 389-430en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0026-749Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42121-
dc.description.abstractThe story of the ‘opening’ of Korea presents us with a peculiar problem of its own. For, when Westerners arrived on the shores of Korea in the nineteenth century, they found a country that was shielded in the shadow of China. Korea, so it seemed to Westerners, would not open the country without Chinese approval, but China would not interfere in Korea on Western countries' behalf or, at times, even on her own behalf. And both Korea and China professed that they were acting according to the dictates of the traditional relationship which had bound the two countries for many centuries in peace and harmony. To Western observers this traditional Sino-Korean relationship seemed to offer nothing but a diplomatic cul-de-sac. Under the circumstances, it is not surprising that Western diplomats concluded that this relationship was merely ceremonial and largely dismissed it as having little political consequence.en_HK
dc.format.extent189047 bytes-
dc.format.extent50903 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ASSen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsModern Asian Studies. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectAsian studies political scienceen_HK
dc.titleKorea, China, and Western Barbarians: Diplomacy in Early Nineteenth-Century Koreaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0026-749X&volume=32&issue=2&spage=389&epage=430&date=1998&atitle=Korea,+China,+and+Western+Barbarians:+Diplomacy+in+Early+Nineteenth-Century+Koreaen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0026749X9800273Xen_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros37865-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000073469800004-

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