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Article: Pollination in a degraded tropical landscape: a Hong Kong case study

TitlePollination in a degraded tropical landscape: a Hong Kong case study
Authors
KeywordsChina
Pollination
Gnetum
Flower visitors
Apis cerana
Issue Date2001
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TRO
Citation
Journal of Tropical Ecology, 2001, v. 17 n. 1, p. 155-161 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough the pollination biology of many individual plant species has been investigated in the Oriental region, there have been very few community-level studies. The two most comprehensive of these were in the primary mixed dipterocarp forest of Lambir Hills National Park, Sarawak (4°20[prime prime or minute]N: Momose et al. 1998, Sakai et al. 1999) and in the warm temperate evergreen broad-leaved forest and cool temperate mixed forest on Yakushima Island (30°N: Yumoto 1987, 1988). Hong Kong (22°17[prime prime or minute]N) lies midway between these sites, at the northern margin of the tropics, where winter temperatures fall below 10 °C at sea-level for a few days every year and there are occasional frosts above 400 m (Dudgeon & Corlett 1994). Latitudinal effects, however, are compounded in comparisons with other well-studied East Asian sites, by centuries of massive human impact, leaving a degraded landscape of steep, eroded hillsides, covered in fire-maintained grassland, secondary shrublands and, locally, secondary forests (Zhuang & Corlett 1997). This history has left a relatively impoverished fauna but a surprisingly diverse flora, including 400 native tree species (Corlett & Turner 1997). In these circumstances, failures of pollination and dispersal mutualisms might be expected to accelerate the loss of plant species from the landscape (Bond 1994, Kearns & Inouye 1997). Previous studies have shown that most woody vegetation in Hong Kong is dominated by species whose seeds can be dispersed by the commonest avian frugivores, the light-vented and red-whiskered bulbuls (Pycnonotus sinensis (Gmelin) and P. jocosus (Linn.)) and the Japanese white-eye (Zosterops japonicus Swinhoe) (Corlett 1996, 1998), but there is no equivalent information available on pollination biology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42098
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.975
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.569
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCorlett, RTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-08T02:28:54Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-08T02:28:54Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Tropical Ecology, 2001, v. 17 n. 1, p. 155-161en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0266-4674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42098-
dc.description.abstractAlthough the pollination biology of many individual plant species has been investigated in the Oriental region, there have been very few community-level studies. The two most comprehensive of these were in the primary mixed dipterocarp forest of Lambir Hills National Park, Sarawak (4°20[prime prime or minute]N: Momose et al. 1998, Sakai et al. 1999) and in the warm temperate evergreen broad-leaved forest and cool temperate mixed forest on Yakushima Island (30°N: Yumoto 1987, 1988). Hong Kong (22°17[prime prime or minute]N) lies midway between these sites, at the northern margin of the tropics, where winter temperatures fall below 10 °C at sea-level for a few days every year and there are occasional frosts above 400 m (Dudgeon & Corlett 1994). Latitudinal effects, however, are compounded in comparisons with other well-studied East Asian sites, by centuries of massive human impact, leaving a degraded landscape of steep, eroded hillsides, covered in fire-maintained grassland, secondary shrublands and, locally, secondary forests (Zhuang & Corlett 1997). This history has left a relatively impoverished fauna but a surprisingly diverse flora, including 400 native tree species (Corlett & Turner 1997). In these circumstances, failures of pollination and dispersal mutualisms might be expected to accelerate the loss of plant species from the landscape (Bond 1994, Kearns & Inouye 1997). Previous studies have shown that most woody vegetation in Hong Kong is dominated by species whose seeds can be dispersed by the commonest avian frugivores, the light-vented and red-whiskered bulbuls (Pycnonotus sinensis (Gmelin) and P. jocosus (Linn.)) and the Japanese white-eye (Zosterops japonicus Swinhoe) (Corlett 1996, 1998), but there is no equivalent information available on pollination biology.en_HK
dc.format.extent86379 bytes-
dc.format.extent578 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TROen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Tropical Ecology. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectPollinationen_HK
dc.subjectGnetumen_HK
dc.subjectFlower visitorsen_HK
dc.subjectApis ceranaen_HK
dc.titlePollination in a degraded tropical landscape: a Hong Kong case studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0266-4674&volume=17&issue=1&spage=155&epage=161&date=2001&atitle=Pollination+in+a+degraded+tropical+landscape:+a+Hong+Kong+case+studyen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0266467401001109en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035129035-
dc.identifier.hkuros56750-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000166994400010-

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