File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Characteristics of vertebrate-dispersed fruits in Hong Kong

TitleCharacteristics of vertebrate-dispersed fruits in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsBirds
China
Frugivory
Hong kong
Seed dispersal
Issue Date1996
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TRO
Citation
Journal of Tropical Ecology, 1996, v. 12 n. 6, p. 819-833 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong has a native angiosperm flora of approximately 1800 species, of which 27% (482 spp) bear fleshy, presumably vertebrate-dispersed fruits, including 76% of the 337 tree and shrub species and 70% of the 103 climber species. Morphological characteristics were determined for 255 species and nutritional characteristics of the fruit pulp for 153 species. Most fruit species were black (45 1%) or red (24.3%) and 85.9% had a mean diameter <13 mm Nutritional characteristics varied widely between species with ranges and median values as follows: pulp percentage (range 10.0-99 2%, median 69 2%), water content of pulp (11 1-94 0%, 78%), lipid (0-84 0%, 2 0%), soluble carbohydrate (4-88%, 53%), nitrogen (0.2-3.4%, 0.86%), neutral detergent fibre (1-44%, 14.3%) Fruit development time (50-360 d, 156 d) showed a negative correlation with lipid content, but no significant correlation with fruit or seed size. Principal components analysis of fruit characteristics was dominated by a trend from single-seeded fruits with a thin, lipid-rich pulp layer to multiple-seeded fruits with much, watery, carbohydrate-rich pulp. Bird-dispersed species cover the full range of fruit characteristics except those too large to swallow and too hard to peck bits from. Mammals (bats, civets and/or macaques) are known or suspected to consume most of the fruits too large for birds as well as many bird fruits but none with high-lipid content Summer fruits (May-September) were significantly larger and had significantly higher seed size and carbohydrate content than winter fruits (November-March) Winter fruits took more than twice as long to develop as summer fruits.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42093
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.975
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.569

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCorlett, RTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-08T02:28:48Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-08T02:28:48Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Tropical Ecology, 1996, v. 12 n. 6, p. 819-833en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0266-4674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42093-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong has a native angiosperm flora of approximately 1800 species, of which 27% (482 spp) bear fleshy, presumably vertebrate-dispersed fruits, including 76% of the 337 tree and shrub species and 70% of the 103 climber species. Morphological characteristics were determined for 255 species and nutritional characteristics of the fruit pulp for 153 species. Most fruit species were black (45 1%) or red (24.3%) and 85.9% had a mean diameter <13 mm Nutritional characteristics varied widely between species with ranges and median values as follows: pulp percentage (range 10.0-99 2%, median 69 2%), water content of pulp (11 1-94 0%, 78%), lipid (0-84 0%, 2 0%), soluble carbohydrate (4-88%, 53%), nitrogen (0.2-3.4%, 0.86%), neutral detergent fibre (1-44%, 14.3%) Fruit development time (50-360 d, 156 d) showed a negative correlation with lipid content, but no significant correlation with fruit or seed size. Principal components analysis of fruit characteristics was dominated by a trend from single-seeded fruits with a thin, lipid-rich pulp layer to multiple-seeded fruits with much, watery, carbohydrate-rich pulp. Bird-dispersed species cover the full range of fruit characteristics except those too large to swallow and too hard to peck bits from. Mammals (bats, civets and/or macaques) are known or suspected to consume most of the fruits too large for birds as well as many bird fruits but none with high-lipid content Summer fruits (May-September) were significantly larger and had significantly higher seed size and carbohydrate content than winter fruits (November-March) Winter fruits took more than twice as long to develop as summer fruits.en_HK
dc.format.extent808464 bytes-
dc.format.extent578 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=TROen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Tropical Ecology. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectBirdsen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectFrugivoryen_HK
dc.subjectHong kongen_HK
dc.subjectSeed dispersalen_HK
dc.titleCharacteristics of vertebrate-dispersed fruits in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0266-4674&volume=12&issue=6&spage=819&epage=833&date=1996&atitle=Characteristics+of+vertebrate-dispersed+fruits+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030433305-
dc.identifier.hkuros21216-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats