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Article: Slope failure in underconsolidated soft soils during the development of a port in Tianjin, China. Part 2: Analytical study

TitleSlope failure in underconsolidated soft soils during the development of a port in Tianjin, China. Part 2: Analytical study
Authors
KeywordsLand reclamation
Dredge excavation
Slope stability assessment
Landslide investigation
Marine mud
Case studies
Issue Date2005
PublisherN R C Research Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/cgi-bin/rp/rp2_desc_e?cgj
Citation
Canadian Geotechnical Journal, 2005, v. 42 n. 1, p. 166-183 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper presents the analytical study of a major landslide that occurred in a newly dredged slope during port development in the city of Tianjin, northern China. The slope comprised mainly underconsolidated and submerged soft soils. The landslide consisted of a number of individual slides that occurred sequentially and extended retrogressively and laterally into the reclaimed land. The paper proposes a slope stability assessment methodology for the examination of such slope failures, with retrogressive and lateral extension into reclaimed land. Both the total and the effective stress approaches are adopted in the slope stability assessment. Eight different sets of soil shear strength parameters are used in the assessment. They were determined by using different methods in the laboratory and in the field or by back analysis. The assessment results indicate that the total stress approach, together with undrained vane strength values, gives the best result in the stability assessment of the original dredged slope and the subsequent failed slopes. The paper further examines the factors that might have caused or triggered the occurrence of the landslide. Backfilling of a thick general soil layer and a sand cushion for vacuum preloading of the hydraulic fill in the reclaimed land might have rendered the entire slope marginally stable. Lowering of the tidal level might also have had an effect in triggering the landslide. The engineering approach and results presented in this study could be useful in the design and construction of dredged slopes in underconsolidated soft soils.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42060
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.877
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.093
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYue, ZQen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTham, LGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, CFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYan, SWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-01-08T02:27:59Z-
dc.date.available2007-01-08T02:27:59Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationCanadian Geotechnical Journal, 2005, v. 42 n. 1, p. 166-183en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0008-3674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/42060-
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents the analytical study of a major landslide that occurred in a newly dredged slope during port development in the city of Tianjin, northern China. The slope comprised mainly underconsolidated and submerged soft soils. The landslide consisted of a number of individual slides that occurred sequentially and extended retrogressively and laterally into the reclaimed land. The paper proposes a slope stability assessment methodology for the examination of such slope failures, with retrogressive and lateral extension into reclaimed land. Both the total and the effective stress approaches are adopted in the slope stability assessment. Eight different sets of soil shear strength parameters are used in the assessment. They were determined by using different methods in the laboratory and in the field or by back analysis. The assessment results indicate that the total stress approach, together with undrained vane strength values, gives the best result in the stability assessment of the original dredged slope and the subsequent failed slopes. The paper further examines the factors that might have caused or triggered the occurrence of the landslide. Backfilling of a thick general soil layer and a sand cushion for vacuum preloading of the hydraulic fill in the reclaimed land might have rendered the entire slope marginally stable. Lowering of the tidal level might also have had an effect in triggering the landslide. The engineering approach and results presented in this study could be useful in the design and construction of dredged slopes in underconsolidated soft soils.en_HK
dc.format.extent684946 bytes-
dc.format.extent4105 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherN R C Research Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.nrc-cnrc.gc.ca/cgi-bin/rp/rp2_desc_e?cgjen_HK
dc.rightsCanadian Geotechnical Journal. Copyright © N R C Research Press.en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectLand reclamationen_HK
dc.subjectDredge excavationen_HK
dc.subjectSlope stability assessmenten_HK
dc.subjectLandslide investigationen_HK
dc.subjectMarine muden_HK
dc.subjectCase studies-
dc.titleSlope failure in underconsolidated soft soils during the development of a port in Tianjin, China. Part 2: Analytical studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0008-3674&volume=42&issue=1&spage=166&epage=183&date=2005&atitle=Slope+failure+in+underconsolidated+soft+soils+during+the+development+of+a+port+in+Tianjin,+China.+Part+2:+Analytical+studyen_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1139/T04-088en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-19944394571-
dc.identifier.hkuros102319-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-19944394571&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpage-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000227613300013-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, S=18434403800-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYue, ZQ=7102782735-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTham, LG=7006213628-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, CF=8068602600-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan, SW=7401744747-

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