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Article: The relationship between coping style and Internet addiction among mainland Chinese students: A meta-analysis

TitleThe relationship between coping style and Internet addiction among mainland Chinese students: A meta-analysis
Authors
Issue Date2018
Citation
Psychiatry Research, 2018, v. 270, p. 831-841 How to Cite?
AbstractThe matter of whether different coping styles are correlated with increased Internet addiction or not remains a topic of debate. Most researchers have argued that Internet addiction is linked to low positive coping and high negative coping; however, others have rejected this opinion. Consequently, this meta-analysis examined the link between coping style and Internet addiction to address this controversy. Seventy-seven studies comprising 46,025 Chinese adolescent students were analyzed. The results suggested a medium negative correlation between positive coping and Internet addiction and a medium positive correlation between negative coping and Internet addiction. Furthermore, coping style measures, Internet addiction, region, and gender moderated these links. The link between negative coping and Internet addiction was largest when positive coping was measured with the Coping Style Questionnaire (CSQ), smaller when using the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire, and smallest when using other measures. The negative correlation between positive coping and Internet addiction was largest when Internet addiction was measured with the Internet Addiction Test, smaller when using revised Chinese Internet Addiction Scale, and smallest when using other measures. For both positive and negative coping and Internet addiction, the correlations were largest in Eastern China, smaller in Central China, and smallest in Western China.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/290689

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLei, H-
dc.contributor.authorCheong, CM-
dc.contributor.authorLi, S-
dc.contributor.authorLu, M-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-02T05:45:44Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-02T05:45:44Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationPsychiatry Research, 2018, v. 270, p. 831-841-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/290689-
dc.description.abstractThe matter of whether different coping styles are correlated with increased Internet addiction or not remains a topic of debate. Most researchers have argued that Internet addiction is linked to low positive coping and high negative coping; however, others have rejected this opinion. Consequently, this meta-analysis examined the link between coping style and Internet addiction to address this controversy. Seventy-seven studies comprising 46,025 Chinese adolescent students were analyzed. The results suggested a medium negative correlation between positive coping and Internet addiction and a medium positive correlation between negative coping and Internet addiction. Furthermore, coping style measures, Internet addiction, region, and gender moderated these links. The link between negative coping and Internet addiction was largest when positive coping was measured with the Coping Style Questionnaire (CSQ), smaller when using the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire, and smallest when using other measures. The negative correlation between positive coping and Internet addiction was largest when Internet addiction was measured with the Internet Addiction Test, smaller when using revised Chinese Internet Addiction Scale, and smallest when using other measures. For both positive and negative coping and Internet addiction, the correlations were largest in Eastern China, smaller in Central China, and smallest in Western China.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychiatry Research-
dc.titleThe relationship between coping style and Internet addiction among mainland Chinese students: A meta-analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheong, CM: cheongcm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheong, CM=rp02454-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2018.10.079-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85055964328-
dc.identifier.hkuros318525-
dc.identifier.volume270-
dc.identifier.spage831-
dc.identifier.epage841-

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