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Article: Digital Nativity and Information Technology Addiction: Age cohort versus individual difference approaches

TitleDigital Nativity and Information Technology Addiction: Age cohort versus individual difference approaches
Authors
KeywordsDigital nativity
Internet addiction
Internet gaming disorder
Smartphone addiction
Facebook addiction
Issue Date2019
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comphumbeh
Citation
Computers in Human Behavior, 2019, v. 90, p. 1-9 How to Cite?
AbstractA “digital native” is a member of the younger generation who grew up in the cyber age. Although earlier studies have focused on digital natives' competence in information technology (IT) usage, their vulnerability to IT addiction has received scant attention. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesized associations between digital nativity and four common types of IT addiction (i.e., Internet addiction, Internet gaming disorder, smartphone addiction, and Facebook addiction). Specifically, our study adopted a multidimensional approach to compare the associations between specific attributes of digital natives and each types of IT addiction. We further examined whether the attributes of digital natives could explain additional variance in IT addiction beyond that accounted for by age. In 2017, a cross-sectional online survey was conducted through MTurk among 1001 U.S. residents (56% women; meanage = 35.0, rangeage = 18–83). The results revealed robust positive associations between digital nativity and four types of IT addiction, albeit with differential associations between various attributes of digital natives and diverse addiction types. Moreover, attributes of digital natives exhibited explanatory power beyond that provided by age. These findings highlight the value of adopting the multidimensional, individual difference approach in the study of digital nativity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289617
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 5.003
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.646

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWANG, HY-
dc.contributor.authorSIGERSON, LL-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, C-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:15:06Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:15:06Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationComputers in Human Behavior, 2019, v. 90, p. 1-9-
dc.identifier.issn0747-5632-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289617-
dc.description.abstractA “digital native” is a member of the younger generation who grew up in the cyber age. Although earlier studies have focused on digital natives' competence in information technology (IT) usage, their vulnerability to IT addiction has received scant attention. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesized associations between digital nativity and four common types of IT addiction (i.e., Internet addiction, Internet gaming disorder, smartphone addiction, and Facebook addiction). Specifically, our study adopted a multidimensional approach to compare the associations between specific attributes of digital natives and each types of IT addiction. We further examined whether the attributes of digital natives could explain additional variance in IT addiction beyond that accounted for by age. In 2017, a cross-sectional online survey was conducted through MTurk among 1001 U.S. residents (56% women; meanage = 35.0, rangeage = 18–83). The results revealed robust positive associations between digital nativity and four types of IT addiction, albeit with differential associations between various attributes of digital natives and diverse addiction types. Moreover, attributes of digital natives exhibited explanatory power beyond that provided by age. These findings highlight the value of adopting the multidimensional, individual difference approach in the study of digital nativity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comphumbeh-
dc.relation.ispartofComputers in Human Behavior-
dc.subjectDigital nativity-
dc.subjectInternet addiction-
dc.subjectInternet gaming disorder-
dc.subjectSmartphone addiction-
dc.subjectFacebook addiction-
dc.titleDigital Nativity and Information Technology Addiction: Age cohort versus individual difference approaches-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, C: ceccheng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, C=rp00588-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chb.2018.08.031-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85053054786-
dc.identifier.hkuros317325-
dc.identifier.volume90-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage9-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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