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Article: Extracellular Matrix and Cellular Plasticity in Musculoskeletal Development

TitleExtracellular Matrix and Cellular Plasticity in Musculoskeletal Development
Authors
Keywordsextracellular matrix
plasticity
development
limb regeneration
chondrocyte
Issue Date2020
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.frontiersin.org/journals/cell-and-developmental-biology
Citation
Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, 2020, v. 8, p. article no. 781 How to Cite?
AbstractCellular plasticity refers to the ability of cell fates to be reprogrammed given the proper signals, allowing for dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation into different cell fates. In vitro, this can be induced through direct activation of gene expression, however this process does not naturally occur in vivo. Instead, the microenvironment consisting of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and signaling factors, directs the signals presented to cells. Often the ECM is involved in regulating both biochemical and mechanical signals. In stem cell populations, this niche is necessary for maintenance and proper function of the stem cell pool. However, recent studies have demonstrated that differentiated or lineage restricted cells can exit their current state and transform into another state under different situations during development and regeneration. This may be achieved through (1) cells responding to a changing niche; (2) cells migrating and encountering a new niche; and (3) formation of a transitional niche followed by restoration of the homeostatic niche to sequentially guide cells along the regenerative process. This review focuses on examples in musculoskeletal biology, with the concept of ECM regulating cells and stem cells in development and regeneration, extending beyond the conventional concept of small population of progenitor cells, but under the right circumstances even “lineage-restricted” or differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to enter into a different fate.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289596
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 5.201
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMA, SKY-
dc.contributor.authorCHAN, ASF-
dc.contributor.authorRUBAB, A-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WCW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, D-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:14:50Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:14:50Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, 2020, v. 8, p. article no. 781-
dc.identifier.issn2296-634X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289596-
dc.description.abstractCellular plasticity refers to the ability of cell fates to be reprogrammed given the proper signals, allowing for dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation into different cell fates. In vitro, this can be induced through direct activation of gene expression, however this process does not naturally occur in vivo. Instead, the microenvironment consisting of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and signaling factors, directs the signals presented to cells. Often the ECM is involved in regulating both biochemical and mechanical signals. In stem cell populations, this niche is necessary for maintenance and proper function of the stem cell pool. However, recent studies have demonstrated that differentiated or lineage restricted cells can exit their current state and transform into another state under different situations during development and regeneration. This may be achieved through (1) cells responding to a changing niche; (2) cells migrating and encountering a new niche; and (3) formation of a transitional niche followed by restoration of the homeostatic niche to sequentially guide cells along the regenerative process. This review focuses on examples in musculoskeletal biology, with the concept of ECM regulating cells and stem cells in development and regeneration, extending beyond the conventional concept of small population of progenitor cells, but under the right circumstances even “lineage-restricted” or differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to enter into a different fate.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.frontiersin.org/journals/cell-and-developmental-biology-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology-
dc.rightsThis Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectextracellular matrix-
dc.subjectplasticity-
dc.subjectdevelopment-
dc.subjectlimb regeneration-
dc.subjectchondrocyte-
dc.titleExtracellular Matrix and Cellular Plasticity in Musculoskeletal Development-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, WCW: cwilson@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, D: chand@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, D=rp00540-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fcell.2020.00781-
dc.identifier.pmid32984311-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7477050-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85090786795-
dc.identifier.hkuros317378-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 781-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 781-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000570434400001-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-
dc.identifier.issnl2296-634X-

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