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Article: Glycaemia and hand grip strength in aging people: Guangzhou biobank cohort study

TitleGlycaemia and hand grip strength in aging people: Guangzhou biobank cohort study
Authors
KeywordsGlycaemia
Prediabetes
Normoglycaemia
Grip strength
Issue Date2020
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcgeriatr/
Citation
BMC Geriatrics, 2020, v. 20 n. 1, p. article no. 399 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: There is a link between hyperglycemia and mechanical functions of muscle. However, existing evidence of the association between hyperglycemia and weaker muscle strength is limited and inconsistent. We examined whether glycemic status was associated with relative grip strength (RGS) in older Chinese. Methods: In 2008–2012, 9180 participants (2516 men and 6664 women) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study had fasting and 2-h post-load glucose measured. Glycemic status was categorized as normoglycaemia, prediabetes (i.e., impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) and diabetes. RGS was assessed using a Jamar Hydraulic Hand Dynamometer divided by body mass index. General linear model was used to assess the association of glycemic status with RGS. Results: After adjusting for age, smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, health status, body fat percentage and waist circumference, in men, hyperglycemia was associated with a lower RGS, with the RGS being 1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.34, 1.42) in normoglycaemia, 1.35 (95% CI = 1.30, 1.39) in prediabetes, 1.33 (95% CI = 1.29, 1.38) in newly diagnosed diabetes and 1.32 (95% CI = 1.27, 1.37) in known diabetes (P for trend < 0.001). The association of glycemic status with RGS was non-significant in women. Among the normoglycaemic group, no association was found between fasting glucose and RGS in men, whereas a significantly inverse association was found in women, with adjusted β for RGS per mmol/l increase in fasting glucose being − 0.05 to − 0.04 (P values from 0.002 to 0.03). Conclusions: Higher fasting glucose was associated with reduced grip strength in a dose-response manner, and the association was significant even in women with normoglycaemia. Our findings suggest that lowering glucose across the whole range might be important in preserving muscle strength, especially in aging women.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289554
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 2.818
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.025
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiang, X-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, C-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, W-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, F-
dc.contributor.authorJin, YL-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KK-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.contributor.authorXu, L-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:14:16Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:14:16Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Geriatrics, 2020, v. 20 n. 1, p. article no. 399-
dc.identifier.issn1471-2318-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289554-
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is a link between hyperglycemia and mechanical functions of muscle. However, existing evidence of the association between hyperglycemia and weaker muscle strength is limited and inconsistent. We examined whether glycemic status was associated with relative grip strength (RGS) in older Chinese. Methods: In 2008–2012, 9180 participants (2516 men and 6664 women) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study had fasting and 2-h post-load glucose measured. Glycemic status was categorized as normoglycaemia, prediabetes (i.e., impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance) and diabetes. RGS was assessed using a Jamar Hydraulic Hand Dynamometer divided by body mass index. General linear model was used to assess the association of glycemic status with RGS. Results: After adjusting for age, smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, health status, body fat percentage and waist circumference, in men, hyperglycemia was associated with a lower RGS, with the RGS being 1.38 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.34, 1.42) in normoglycaemia, 1.35 (95% CI = 1.30, 1.39) in prediabetes, 1.33 (95% CI = 1.29, 1.38) in newly diagnosed diabetes and 1.32 (95% CI = 1.27, 1.37) in known diabetes (P for trend < 0.001). The association of glycemic status with RGS was non-significant in women. Among the normoglycaemic group, no association was found between fasting glucose and RGS in men, whereas a significantly inverse association was found in women, with adjusted β for RGS per mmol/l increase in fasting glucose being − 0.05 to − 0.04 (P values from 0.002 to 0.03). Conclusions: Higher fasting glucose was associated with reduced grip strength in a dose-response manner, and the association was significant even in women with normoglycaemia. Our findings suggest that lowering glucose across the whole range might be important in preserving muscle strength, especially in aging women.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcgeriatr/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Geriatrics-
dc.rightsBMC Geriatrics. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectGlycaemia-
dc.subjectPrediabetes-
dc.subjectNormoglycaemia-
dc.subjectGrip strength-
dc.titleGlycaemia and hand grip strength in aging people: Guangzhou biobank cohort study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJiang, C: cqjiang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, W: zhangws9@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, KK: chengkk@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailXu, L: linxu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.identifier.authorityXu, L=rp02030-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12877-020-01808-0-
dc.identifier.pmid33046005-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7552450-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85092567709-
dc.identifier.hkuros317364-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 399-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 399-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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