File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Mortality And Morbidity of Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries; A Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Experience Over 15 Years

TitleMortality And Morbidity of Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries; A Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Experience Over 15 Years
Authors
KeywordsMortality
Length of Stay
PICU
Traumatic Brain injury
Falls
Issue Date2019
PublisherShiraz University of Medical Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://beat.sums.ac.ir/
Citation
Bulletin of Emergency and Trauma, 2019, v. 7 n. 3, p. 256-262 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To determine the mortality, morbidity, types of intracranial hemorrhages, and factors associated with length of stay (LOS) associated with accidental traumatic brain injury (TBI) at a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a regional trauma center in an Asian city. Methods: This study is a retrospective review of types of head injury, mortality and morbidity demographics of patients admitted to a PICU with TBI. All patients with accidental TBI were included, namely road traffic injury (RTI) and fall, and their demographics compared. Non-accidental injuries (NAI) were excluded. Results: 95 children (78% males) were admitted to a PICU with RTI or falls from 2002 to 2017. They accounted for 3.7% of PICU admissions. Comparing with falls, victims of RTI were older (p<0.001) and more likely to suffer from skull fracture (p=0.017). There were 4 deaths with falls (6.8%) but none with RTI. Subarachnoid hemorrhages, extradural hemorrhages, the use of mechanical ventilation, inotropes and neurological supports were associated with longer LOS in PICU in these injuries (p<0.001). Conclusion: A longer PICU LOS is associated with extradural and subarachnoid hemorrhages, usage of inotropes, mechanical ventilation and neurological supports in falls and RTI. Three-quarters of victims are males. Preventive health education should be especially directed to boys to reduce severe TBI in this Asian city.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289278
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKam, LH-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, SW-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, WS-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, HM-
dc.contributor.authorIp, P-
dc.contributor.authorZee, B-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:10:23Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:10:23Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBulletin of Emergency and Trauma, 2019, v. 7 n. 3, p. 256-262-
dc.identifier.issn2322-2522-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289278-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To determine the mortality, morbidity, types of intracranial hemorrhages, and factors associated with length of stay (LOS) associated with accidental traumatic brain injury (TBI) at a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a regional trauma center in an Asian city. Methods: This study is a retrospective review of types of head injury, mortality and morbidity demographics of patients admitted to a PICU with TBI. All patients with accidental TBI were included, namely road traffic injury (RTI) and fall, and their demographics compared. Non-accidental injuries (NAI) were excluded. Results: 95 children (78% males) were admitted to a PICU with RTI or falls from 2002 to 2017. They accounted for 3.7% of PICU admissions. Comparing with falls, victims of RTI were older (p<0.001) and more likely to suffer from skull fracture (p=0.017). There were 4 deaths with falls (6.8%) but none with RTI. Subarachnoid hemorrhages, extradural hemorrhages, the use of mechanical ventilation, inotropes and neurological supports were associated with longer LOS in PICU in these injuries (p<0.001). Conclusion: A longer PICU LOS is associated with extradural and subarachnoid hemorrhages, usage of inotropes, mechanical ventilation and neurological supports in falls and RTI. Three-quarters of victims are males. Preventive health education should be especially directed to boys to reduce severe TBI in this Asian city.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherShiraz University of Medical Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://beat.sums.ac.ir/-
dc.relation.ispartofBulletin of Emergency and Trauma-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectMortality-
dc.subjectLength of Stay-
dc.subjectPICU-
dc.subjectTraumatic Brain injury-
dc.subjectFalls-
dc.titleMortality And Morbidity of Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries; A Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Experience Over 15 Years-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailIp, P: patricip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.29252/beat-070308-
dc.identifier.hkuros316063-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage256-
dc.identifier.epage262-
dc.publisher.placeIslamic Republic of Iran-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats