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Book Chapter: Hypoxia and the Metastatic Niche

TitleHypoxia and the Metastatic Niche
Authors
KeywordsPMN (Premetastatic niche)
BMDC (bone marrow-derived cell)
TAM (tumor-associated macrophage)
Treg (regulatory T cell)
MDSC (myeloid-derived suppressor cell)
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Hypoxia and the Metastatic Niche. In Gilkes, D (Eds.), Hypoxia and Cancer Metastasis, p. 97-112. Cham: Springer, 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractMetastasis is considered the latest stage of cancer development; however, metastasis occurs earlier than it can be detected. Metastatic sites are actively remodeled by secretory factors including growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, extracellular matrix (ECM) enzymes, and exosomes produced by the primary cancer tissues. Many of the associated-secretory factors are abundantly induced by inflammation and hypoxia. These secretory factors modify the ECM, immune composition, and blood vessel permeability of the future metastatic sites, a process termed ‘metastatic niche formation.’ In general, ECM is modified to enhance the attachment of other cell types or cancer cells to establish a growth-factor rich metastatic niche. Immune-suppressive cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) dominate the metastatic niche to allow metastatic cancer cells to bypass immune surveillance and propagate. Endothelial cell-to-cell junctions of blood vessels are loosened to enhance the penetrance of metastatic cancer cells to the metastatic sites. Different metastatic tissues have unique ECM constituents, resident immune cells, and anatomical positions linked with the circulatory system; therefore, many cancer types have their own metastatic pattern, and they favor metastasis to specific organs. Some of the remodeling events represent the earliest step of metastasis, even preceding the detachment of cancer cells from the primary tumor site. Understanding how the metastatic niche is formed is important for the development of drugs to prevent the earliest step of metastasis and advance our understanding of organotrophic metastasis. This review summarizes the major findings in the field of metastatic niche highlighting the role of hypoxia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289103
ISBN
Series/Report no.Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology ; v. 1136

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YK-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, WH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CCL-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:07:52Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:07:52Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationHypoxia and the Metastatic Niche. In Gilkes, D (Eds.), Hypoxia and Cancer Metastasis, p. 97-112. Cham: Springer, 2019-
dc.identifier.isbn9783030127336-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289103-
dc.description.abstractMetastasis is considered the latest stage of cancer development; however, metastasis occurs earlier than it can be detected. Metastatic sites are actively remodeled by secretory factors including growth factors, chemokines and cytokines, extracellular matrix (ECM) enzymes, and exosomes produced by the primary cancer tissues. Many of the associated-secretory factors are abundantly induced by inflammation and hypoxia. These secretory factors modify the ECM, immune composition, and blood vessel permeability of the future metastatic sites, a process termed ‘metastatic niche formation.’ In general, ECM is modified to enhance the attachment of other cell types or cancer cells to establish a growth-factor rich metastatic niche. Immune-suppressive cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) dominate the metastatic niche to allow metastatic cancer cells to bypass immune surveillance and propagate. Endothelial cell-to-cell junctions of blood vessels are loosened to enhance the penetrance of metastatic cancer cells to the metastatic sites. Different metastatic tissues have unique ECM constituents, resident immune cells, and anatomical positions linked with the circulatory system; therefore, many cancer types have their own metastatic pattern, and they favor metastasis to specific organs. Some of the remodeling events represent the earliest step of metastasis, even preceding the detachment of cancer cells from the primary tumor site. Understanding how the metastatic niche is formed is important for the development of drugs to prevent the earliest step of metastasis and advance our understanding of organotrophic metastasis. This review summarizes the major findings in the field of metastatic niche highlighting the role of hypoxia.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relation.ispartofHypoxia and Cancer Metastasis-
dc.relation.ispartofseriesAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology ; v. 1136-
dc.subjectPMN (Premetastatic niche)-
dc.subjectBMDC (bone marrow-derived cell)-
dc.subjectTAM (tumor-associated macrophage)-
dc.subjectTreg (regulatory T cell)-
dc.subjectMDSC (myeloid-derived suppressor cell)-
dc.titleHypoxia and the Metastatic Niche-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CCL: carmencl@pathology.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CCL=rp01602-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-030-12734-3_7-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85067598145-
dc.identifier.hkuros316599-
dc.identifier.spage97-
dc.identifier.epage112-
dc.publisher.placeCham-

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