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Article: Consuming decaffeinated coffee with milk and sugar added before a high-glycaemic index meal improves postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses in healthy adults

TitleConsuming decaffeinated coffee with milk and sugar added before a high-glycaemic index meal improves postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses in healthy adults
Authors
KeywordsCoffee
Adults
Sugar
Milk
Postprandial glucose
Issue Date2020
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJN
Citation
The British Journal of Nutrition, 2020, v. 124 n. 8, p. 785-796 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study aimed to compare the effects of drinking different types of coffee before a high-glycaemic index (GI) meal on postprandial glucose metabolism and to assess the effects of adding milk and sugar into coffee. In this randomised, crossover, acute feeding study, apparently healthy adults (n 21) consumed the test drink followed by a high-GI meal in each session. Different types of coffee (espresso, instant, boiled and decaffeinated, all with milk and sugar) and plain water were tested in separate sessions, while a subset of the participants (n 10) completed extra sessions using black coffees. Postprandial levels of glucose, insulin, active glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and nitrotyrosine between different test drinks were compared using linear mixed models. Results showed that only preloading decaffeinated coffee with milk and sugar led to significantly lower glucose incremental AUC (iAUC; 14 % lower, P = 0·001) than water. Preloading black coffees led to greater postprandial glucose iAUC than preloading coffees with milk and sugar added (12–35 % smaller, P < 0·05 for all coffee types). Active GLP-1 and nitrotyrosine levels were not significantly different between test drinks. To conclude, preloading decaffeinated coffee with milk and sugar led to a blunted postprandial glycaemic response after a subsequent high-GI meal, while adding milk and sugar into coffee could mitigate the impairment effect of black coffee towards postprandial glucose responses. These findings may partly explain the positive effects of coffee consumption on glucose metabolism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287826
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.334
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.587

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWONG, THT-
dc.contributor.authorWan, JMF-
dc.contributor.authorTse, IMY-
dc.contributor.authorSit, WH-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, JCY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T12:03:51Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-05T12:03:51Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationThe British Journal of Nutrition, 2020, v. 124 n. 8, p. 785-796-
dc.identifier.issn0007-1145-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287826-
dc.description.abstractThe present study aimed to compare the effects of drinking different types of coffee before a high-glycaemic index (GI) meal on postprandial glucose metabolism and to assess the effects of adding milk and sugar into coffee. In this randomised, crossover, acute feeding study, apparently healthy adults (n 21) consumed the test drink followed by a high-GI meal in each session. Different types of coffee (espresso, instant, boiled and decaffeinated, all with milk and sugar) and plain water were tested in separate sessions, while a subset of the participants (n 10) completed extra sessions using black coffees. Postprandial levels of glucose, insulin, active glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and nitrotyrosine between different test drinks were compared using linear mixed models. Results showed that only preloading decaffeinated coffee with milk and sugar led to significantly lower glucose incremental AUC (iAUC; 14 % lower, P = 0·001) than water. Preloading black coffees led to greater postprandial glucose iAUC than preloading coffees with milk and sugar added (12–35 % smaller, P < 0·05 for all coffee types). Active GLP-1 and nitrotyrosine levels were not significantly different between test drinks. To conclude, preloading decaffeinated coffee with milk and sugar led to a blunted postprandial glycaemic response after a subsequent high-GI meal, while adding milk and sugar into coffee could mitigate the impairment effect of black coffee towards postprandial glucose responses. These findings may partly explain the positive effects of coffee consumption on glucose metabolism.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=BJN-
dc.relation.ispartofThe British Journal of Nutrition-
dc.rightsThe British Journal of Nutrition. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsThis article has been published in a revised form in [Journal] [http://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © copyright holder.-
dc.subjectCoffee-
dc.subjectAdults-
dc.subjectSugar-
dc.subjectMilk-
dc.subjectPostprandial glucose-
dc.titleConsuming decaffeinated coffee with milk and sugar added before a high-glycaemic index meal improves postprandial glycaemic and insulinaemic responses in healthy adults-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWan, JMF: jmfwan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTse, IMY: mytsea@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSit, WH: whsit@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLouie, JCY: jimmyl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWan, JMF=rp00798-
dc.identifier.authorityLouie, JCY=rp02118-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0007114520001750-
dc.identifier.pmid32418547-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85085397378-
dc.identifier.hkuros314721-
dc.identifier.volume124-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage785-
dc.identifier.epage796-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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