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Article: Source-specific volatile organic compounds and emergency hospital admissions for cardiorespiratory diseases

TitleSource-specific volatile organic compounds and emergency hospital admissions for cardiorespiratory diseases
Authors
Keywordsvolatile organic compounds
source apportionment
cardiovascular disease
respiratory disease
emergency hospital admissions
Issue Date2020
PublisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph
Citation
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2020, v. 17, p. article no. E6210 How to Cite?
AbstractKnowledge gaps remain regarding the cardiorespiratory impacts of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for the general population. This study identified contributing sources to ambient VOCs and estimated the short-term effects of VOC apportioned sources on daily emergency hospital admissions for cardiorespiratory diseases in Hong Kong from 2011 to 2014. We estimated VOC source contributions using fourteen organic chemicals by positive matrix factorization. Then, we examined the associations between the short-term exposure to VOC apportioned sources and emergency hospital admissions for cause-specific cardiorespiratory diseases using generalized additive models with polynomial distributed lag models while controlling for meteorological and co-pollutant confounders. We identified six VOC sources: gasoline emissions, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) usage, aged VOCs, architectural paints, household products, and biogenic emissions. We found that increased emergency hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were positively linked to ambient VOCs from gasoline emissions (excess risk (ER%): 2.1%; 95% CI: 0.9% to 3.4%), architectural paints (ER%: 1.5%; 95% CI: 0.2% to 2.9%), and household products (ER%: 1.5%; 95% CI: 0.2% to 2.8%), but negatively associated with biogenic VOCs (ER%: −6.6%; 95% CI: −10.4% to −2.5%). Increased congestive heart failure admissions were positively related to VOCs from architectural paints and household products in cold seasons. This study suggested that source-specific VOCs might trigger the exacerbation of cardiorespiratory diseases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287580
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.849
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.883
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRAN, J-
dc.contributor.authorMarianthi-Anna, K-
dc.contributor.authorSUN, S-
dc.contributor.authorHan, L-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, S-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, W-
dc.contributor.authorLI, J-
dc.contributor.authorTian, L-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T12:00:09Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-05T12:00:09Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2020, v. 17, p. article no. E6210-
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287580-
dc.description.abstractKnowledge gaps remain regarding the cardiorespiratory impacts of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for the general population. This study identified contributing sources to ambient VOCs and estimated the short-term effects of VOC apportioned sources on daily emergency hospital admissions for cardiorespiratory diseases in Hong Kong from 2011 to 2014. We estimated VOC source contributions using fourteen organic chemicals by positive matrix factorization. Then, we examined the associations between the short-term exposure to VOC apportioned sources and emergency hospital admissions for cause-specific cardiorespiratory diseases using generalized additive models with polynomial distributed lag models while controlling for meteorological and co-pollutant confounders. We identified six VOC sources: gasoline emissions, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) usage, aged VOCs, architectural paints, household products, and biogenic emissions. We found that increased emergency hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were positively linked to ambient VOCs from gasoline emissions (excess risk (ER%): 2.1%; 95% CI: 0.9% to 3.4%), architectural paints (ER%: 1.5%; 95% CI: 0.2% to 2.9%), and household products (ER%: 1.5%; 95% CI: 0.2% to 2.8%), but negatively associated with biogenic VOCs (ER%: −6.6%; 95% CI: −10.4% to −2.5%). Increased congestive heart failure admissions were positively related to VOCs from architectural paints and household products in cold seasons. This study suggested that source-specific VOCs might trigger the exacerbation of cardiorespiratory diseases.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectvolatile organic compounds-
dc.subjectsource apportionment-
dc.subjectcardiovascular disease-
dc.subjectrespiratory disease-
dc.subjectemergency hospital admissions-
dc.titleSource-specific volatile organic compounds and emergency hospital admissions for cardiorespiratory diseases-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTian, L: linweit@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, L=rp01991-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph17176210-
dc.identifier.pmid32867048-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7503811-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85090101559-
dc.identifier.hkuros314814-
dc.identifier.volume17-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. E6210-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. E6210-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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