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Article: Long-term impact of oral surgery with or without amoxicillin on the oral microbiome-A prospective cohort study

TitleLong-term impact of oral surgery with or without amoxicillin on the oral microbiome-A prospective cohort study
Authors
KeywordsDry Socket
Molar, Third
Alveolar osteitis
Issue Date2019
PublisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2019, v. 9 n. 1, p. article no. 18761 How to Cite?
AbstractRoutine postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not recommended for third molar extractions. However, amoxicillin still continues to be used customarily in several clinical practices worldwide to prevent infections. A prospective cohort study was conducted in cohorts who underwent third molar extractions with (group EA, n = 20) or without (group E, n = 20) amoxicillin (250 mg three times daily for 5 days). Further, a control group without amoxicillin and extractions (group C, n = 17) was included. Salivary samples were collected at baseline, 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-weeks and 3 months to assess the bacterial shift and antibiotic resistance gene changes employing 16S rRNA gene sequencing (Illumina-Miseq) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A further 6-month follow-up was performed for groups E and EA. Seven operational taxonomic units reported a significant change from baseline to 3 months for group EA (adjusted p < 0.05). No significant change in relative abundance of bacteria and β-lactamase resistance genes (TEM-1) was observed over 6 months for any group (adjusted p > 0.05). In conclusion, the salivary microbiome is resilient to an antibiotic challenge by a low-dose regimen of amoxicillin. Further studies evaluating the effect of routinely used higher dose regimens of amoxicillin on gram-negative bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes are warranted.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282498
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.122
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMenon, RK-
dc.contributor.authorGomez, A-
dc.contributor.authorBrandt, BW-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YY-
dc.contributor.authorGopinath, D-
dc.contributor.authorWatt, RM-
dc.contributor.authorCrielaard, W-
dc.contributor.authorNelson, KE-
dc.contributor.authorBotelho, MG-
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-15T05:28:54Z-
dc.date.available2020-05-15T05:28:54Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2019, v. 9 n. 1, p. article no. 18761-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282498-
dc.description.abstractRoutine postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis is not recommended for third molar extractions. However, amoxicillin still continues to be used customarily in several clinical practices worldwide to prevent infections. A prospective cohort study was conducted in cohorts who underwent third molar extractions with (group EA, n = 20) or without (group E, n = 20) amoxicillin (250 mg three times daily for 5 days). Further, a control group without amoxicillin and extractions (group C, n = 17) was included. Salivary samples were collected at baseline, 1-, 2-, 3-, 4-weeks and 3 months to assess the bacterial shift and antibiotic resistance gene changes employing 16S rRNA gene sequencing (Illumina-Miseq) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. A further 6-month follow-up was performed for groups E and EA. Seven operational taxonomic units reported a significant change from baseline to 3 months for group EA (adjusted p < 0.05). No significant change in relative abundance of bacteria and β-lactamase resistance genes (TEM-1) was observed over 6 months for any group (adjusted p > 0.05). In conclusion, the salivary microbiome is resilient to an antibiotic challenge by a low-dose regimen of amoxicillin. Further studies evaluating the effect of routinely used higher dose regimens of amoxicillin on gram-negative bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes are warranted.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectDry Socket-
dc.subjectMolar, Third-
dc.subjectAlveolar osteitis-
dc.titleLong-term impact of oral surgery with or without amoxicillin on the oral microbiome-A prospective cohort study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, YY: mleung04@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWatt, RM: rmwatt@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailBotelho, MG: botelho@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, YY=rp01522-
dc.identifier.authorityWatt, RM=rp00043-
dc.identifier.authorityBotelho, MG=rp00033-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-019-55056-3-
dc.identifier.pmid31822712-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6904678-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85076413712-
dc.identifier.hkuros309906-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 18761-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 18761-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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