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postgraduate thesis: Altruism or opportunism : international humanitarian assistance to Japan following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami

TitleAltruism or opportunism : international humanitarian assistance to Japan following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami
Authors
Advisors
Issue Date2018
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chong, P. B. [莊盼]. (2018). Altruism or opportunism : international humanitarian assistance to Japan following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThe magnitude 9.0 earthquake that occurred on 11 March 2011 was the largest earthquake ever to hit Japan as well as the fourth most-powerful earthquake in the world since modern record-keeping began. This thesis looks at international humanitarian assistance to Japan following the 3.11 Disaster. It focuses on giving from two countries – America, which gave the most aid, and Taiwan, which gave the most aid per capita. In order to provide a comprehensive overview on humanitarian aid provided by different segments of society, this study covers a variety of perspectives which on humanitarian giving following the 3.11 Disaster. It analyses the factors motivated people from both countries to give, who were involved in giving, and how they gave. Givers ranged from various agencies of governments from both countries to members of the general public, businesses to non-governmental organizations. The first two chapters look at America’s humanitarian aid to Japan. Chapter One explores the private donations given by Americans, including various NGOs, businesses and individuals from different parts of the country. Chapter Two details relief efforts undertaken by US government agencies, including the US Forces Japan. Chapter Three documents Taiwan’s giving from different level of the country. Although it is difficult to generalize every individual’s act of giving and ascertain “the most important” motivation to give, this thesis aims to address broad themes of humanitarian giving and why people give to far away sufferers in need. It argues that governments and individuals often have different concerns when providing overseas humanitarian aid. National interest was a major motivation for governments to respond to this overseas disaster. Providing generous aid could also improve company or even country image. Businesses, and sometimes religious groups, were active in giving because many of them considered Japan as an important market. As for non-governmental organizations and communities, familiarity was a crucial factor that motivated people to donate.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectEarthquake relief - Japan
Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami, Japan, 2011
Tsunami relief - Japan
Dept/ProgramHistory
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281281
AwardHKU 3 Minute Thesis Award, 2nd Runner-up (2018)
HKU 3 Minute Thesis Award, Online People’s Choice Award (2018)

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorSchencking, JC-
dc.contributor.advisorNakano, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChong, Pang, Beatrice-
dc.contributor.author莊盼-
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-10T08:46:31Z-
dc.date.available2020-03-10T08:46:31Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationChong, P. B. [莊盼]. (2018). Altruism or opportunism : international humanitarian assistance to Japan following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281281-
dc.description.abstractThe magnitude 9.0 earthquake that occurred on 11 March 2011 was the largest earthquake ever to hit Japan as well as the fourth most-powerful earthquake in the world since modern record-keeping began. This thesis looks at international humanitarian assistance to Japan following the 3.11 Disaster. It focuses on giving from two countries – America, which gave the most aid, and Taiwan, which gave the most aid per capita. In order to provide a comprehensive overview on humanitarian aid provided by different segments of society, this study covers a variety of perspectives which on humanitarian giving following the 3.11 Disaster. It analyses the factors motivated people from both countries to give, who were involved in giving, and how they gave. Givers ranged from various agencies of governments from both countries to members of the general public, businesses to non-governmental organizations. The first two chapters look at America’s humanitarian aid to Japan. Chapter One explores the private donations given by Americans, including various NGOs, businesses and individuals from different parts of the country. Chapter Two details relief efforts undertaken by US government agencies, including the US Forces Japan. Chapter Three documents Taiwan’s giving from different level of the country. Although it is difficult to generalize every individual’s act of giving and ascertain “the most important” motivation to give, this thesis aims to address broad themes of humanitarian giving and why people give to far away sufferers in need. It argues that governments and individuals often have different concerns when providing overseas humanitarian aid. National interest was a major motivation for governments to respond to this overseas disaster. Providing generous aid could also improve company or even country image. Businesses, and sometimes religious groups, were active in giving because many of them considered Japan as an important market. As for non-governmental organizations and communities, familiarity was a crucial factor that motivated people to donate.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshEarthquake relief - Japan-
dc.subject.lcshTohoku Earthquake and Tsunami, Japan, 2011-
dc.subject.lcshTsunami relief - Japan-
dc.titleAltruism or opportunism : international humanitarian assistance to Japan following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineHistory-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2019-
dc.description.awardHKU 3 Minute Thesis Award, 2nd Runner-up (2018)-
dc.description.awardHKU 3 Minute Thesis Award, Online People’s Choice Award (2018)-
dc.identifier.mmsid991044104200803414-

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