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Article: Genetic and epigenetic effects on centromere establishment

TitleGenetic and epigenetic effects on centromere establishment
Authors
KeywordsAcentric chromosomes
Artificial chromosomes
Centromeres
Dicentric chromosomes
Epigenetics
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springeronline.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,10735,5-40109-70-1066702-0,00.html
Citation
Chromosoma: biology of the nucleus, 2019, Epub How to Cite?
AbstractEndogenous chromosomes contain centromeres to direct equal chromosomal segregation in mitosis and meiosis. The location and function of existing centromeres is usually maintained through cell cycles and generations. Recent studies have investigated how the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A is assembled and replenished after DNA replication to epigenetically propagate the centromere identity. However, existing centromeres occasionally become inactivated, with or without change in underlying DNA sequences, or lost after chromosomal rearrangements, resulting in acentric chromosomes. New centromeres, known as neocentromeres, may form on ectopic, non-centromeric chromosomal regions to rescue acentric chromosomes from being lost, or form dicentric chromosomes if the original centromere is still active. In addition, de novo centromeres can form after chromatinization of purified DNA that is exogenously introduced into cells. Here, we review the phenomena of naturally occurring and experimentally induced new centromeres and summarize the genetic (DNA sequence) and epigenetic features of these new centromeres. We compare the characteristics of new and native centromeres to understand whether there are different requirements for centromere establishment and propagation. Based on our understanding of the mechanisms of new centromere formation, we discuss the perspectives of developing more stably segregating human artificial chromosomes to facilitate gene delivery in therapeutics and research. © 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280092
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.021
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.397

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLing, YH-
dc.contributor.authorLin, Z-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KWY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-06T02:00:51Z-
dc.date.available2020-01-06T02:00:51Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationChromosoma: biology of the nucleus, 2019, Epub-
dc.identifier.issn0009-5915-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280092-
dc.description.abstractEndogenous chromosomes contain centromeres to direct equal chromosomal segregation in mitosis and meiosis. The location and function of existing centromeres is usually maintained through cell cycles and generations. Recent studies have investigated how the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A is assembled and replenished after DNA replication to epigenetically propagate the centromere identity. However, existing centromeres occasionally become inactivated, with or without change in underlying DNA sequences, or lost after chromosomal rearrangements, resulting in acentric chromosomes. New centromeres, known as neocentromeres, may form on ectopic, non-centromeric chromosomal regions to rescue acentric chromosomes from being lost, or form dicentric chromosomes if the original centromere is still active. In addition, de novo centromeres can form after chromatinization of purified DNA that is exogenously introduced into cells. Here, we review the phenomena of naturally occurring and experimentally induced new centromeres and summarize the genetic (DNA sequence) and epigenetic features of these new centromeres. We compare the characteristics of new and native centromeres to understand whether there are different requirements for centromere establishment and propagation. Based on our understanding of the mechanisms of new centromere formation, we discuss the perspectives of developing more stably segregating human artificial chromosomes to facilitate gene delivery in therapeutics and research. © 2019, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springeronline.com/sgw/cda/frontpage/0,10735,5-40109-70-1066702-0,00.html-
dc.relation.ispartofChromosoma: biology of the nucleus-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectAcentric chromosomes-
dc.subjectArtificial chromosomes-
dc.subjectCentromeres-
dc.subjectDicentric chromosomes-
dc.subjectEpigenetics-
dc.titleGenetic and epigenetic effects on centromere establishment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLing, YH: yhling@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLin, Z: wzylin@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KWY: kwyyuen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KWY=rp01512-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00412-019-00727-3-
dc.identifier.pmid31781852-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85076118812-
dc.identifier.hkuros308902-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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