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Article: Family socioeconomic status and Chinese children’s early academic development: Examining child-level mechanisms

TitleFamily socioeconomic status and Chinese children’s early academic development: Examining child-level mechanisms
Authors
KeywordsSocioeconomic status
Academic skills
Science
Vocabulary
Self-regulation
Issue Date2019
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cedpsych
Citation
Contemporary Educational Psychology, 2019, v. 59, article no. 101792 How to Cite?
AbstractThe longitudinal relations of family socioeconomic status (SES) to receptive vocabulary, behavioral regulation, and four domains of academic learning (reading, math, life science, and earth and physical sciences) were examined for a representative sample of 588 Chinese children (ages 5–6). The results showed significant SES disparities across all four academic domains. SES was even predictive of later performance in math, life science, and earth and physical sciences after controlling for earlier performance. The SES disparities in math, life science, and earth and physical science were mediated via receptive vocabulary and behavioral regulation that operated in a dynamic and interactive manner, although receptive vocabulary had some mediation effects independent of behavioral regulation. The findings add to the literature by documenting SES disparities in science knowledge at an early age. They also highlight the importance of examining the dynamic relations among child-level mechanisms that contribute to SES-related academic disparities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275777
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.863
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.426

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, X-
dc.contributor.authorHu, B Y-
dc.contributor.authorRen, L-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, L-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:49:29Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:49:29Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationContemporary Educational Psychology, 2019, v. 59, article no. 101792-
dc.identifier.issn0361-476X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275777-
dc.description.abstractThe longitudinal relations of family socioeconomic status (SES) to receptive vocabulary, behavioral regulation, and four domains of academic learning (reading, math, life science, and earth and physical sciences) were examined for a representative sample of 588 Chinese children (ages 5–6). The results showed significant SES disparities across all four academic domains. SES was even predictive of later performance in math, life science, and earth and physical sciences after controlling for earlier performance. The SES disparities in math, life science, and earth and physical science were mediated via receptive vocabulary and behavioral regulation that operated in a dynamic and interactive manner, although receptive vocabulary had some mediation effects independent of behavioral regulation. The findings add to the literature by documenting SES disparities in science knowledge at an early age. They also highlight the importance of examining the dynamic relations among child-level mechanisms that contribute to SES-related academic disparities.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cedpsych-
dc.relation.ispartofContemporary Educational Psychology-
dc.subjectSocioeconomic status-
dc.subjectAcademic skills-
dc.subjectScience-
dc.subjectVocabulary-
dc.subjectSelf-regulation-
dc.titleFamily socioeconomic status and Chinese children’s early academic development: Examining child-level mechanisms-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, X: xzhang1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, X=rp02192-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cedpsych.2019.101792-
dc.identifier.hkuros303124-
dc.identifier.volume59-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 101792-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 101792-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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