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Article: Designing Unplugged and Plugged Activities to Cultivate Computational Thinking: An Exploratory Study in Early Childhood Education

TitleDesigning Unplugged and Plugged Activities to Cultivate Computational Thinking: An Exploratory Study in Early Childhood Education
Authors
KeywordsActivity design
Computational thinking
Early childhood education
Preschoolers
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/journal/40299
Citation
The Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, 2019, Epub How to Cite?
AbstractEducators and policy makers have increasingly recognized the importance of computational thinking (CT). Despite the growing body of CT literature, how to cultivate CT is still underexplored and undertheorized in early childhood education. Informed by Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development, this exploratory study was conducted with a focus on three CT skills: pattern recognition, sequencing, and algorithm design. The framework for the study was developed in two stages. First, we designed two sets of unplugged activities (relying on tangible materials), aiming to (1) provide students with more concrete experiences of CT and (2) equip them with the necessary vocabularies/instructions for the subsequent plugged activity (with a digital device). The theoretical foundation for such an unplugged and plugged design comprised Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development and Asher’s Total Physical Response. In the second stage, we offered our CT course in a kindergarten in Hong Kong, involving six teacher participants and a total of 11 students from K1 to K3 (aged 3 to 6). After 10 h of CT training, almost all students demonstrated their mastery of pattern recognition and sequencing. However, the K1 students could only partially complete the tasks of algorithm design while the others generally reached the target level of achievement. Strengthening preschoolers’ training on CT language and differentiated instruction are some possible strategies to improve the CT instructions. © 2019, De La Salle University.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275166
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 0.744
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.353

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSaxena, A-
dc.contributor.authorLo, CK-
dc.contributor.authorHew, KF-
dc.contributor.authorWong, GKW-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:36:54Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:36:54Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationThe Asia-Pacific Education Researcher, 2019, Epub-
dc.identifier.issn0119-5646-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275166-
dc.description.abstractEducators and policy makers have increasingly recognized the importance of computational thinking (CT). Despite the growing body of CT literature, how to cultivate CT is still underexplored and undertheorized in early childhood education. Informed by Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development, this exploratory study was conducted with a focus on three CT skills: pattern recognition, sequencing, and algorithm design. The framework for the study was developed in two stages. First, we designed two sets of unplugged activities (relying on tangible materials), aiming to (1) provide students with more concrete experiences of CT and (2) equip them with the necessary vocabularies/instructions for the subsequent plugged activity (with a digital device). The theoretical foundation for such an unplugged and plugged design comprised Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Development and Asher’s Total Physical Response. In the second stage, we offered our CT course in a kindergarten in Hong Kong, involving six teacher participants and a total of 11 students from K1 to K3 (aged 3 to 6). After 10 h of CT training, almost all students demonstrated their mastery of pattern recognition and sequencing. However, the K1 students could only partially complete the tasks of algorithm design while the others generally reached the target level of achievement. Strengthening preschoolers’ training on CT language and differentiated instruction are some possible strategies to improve the CT instructions. © 2019, De La Salle University.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.com/education+%26+language/journal/40299-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Asia-Pacific Education Researcher-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.subjectActivity design-
dc.subjectComputational thinking-
dc.subjectEarly childhood education-
dc.subjectPreschoolers-
dc.titleDesigning Unplugged and Plugged Activities to Cultivate Computational Thinking: An Exploratory Study in Early Childhood Education-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLo, CK: ckloedu@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHew, KF: kfhew@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, GKW: wongkwg@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHew, KF=rp01873-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, GKW=rp02193-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s40299-019-00478-w-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85071431789-
dc.identifier.hkuros304464-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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