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Article: A holistic framework to utilize natural ventilation to optimize energy performance of residential high-rise buildings

TitleA holistic framework to utilize natural ventilation to optimize energy performance of residential high-rise buildings
Authors
KeywordsBuilding information modelling
Computational fluid dynamics
Energy efficiency
High-rise buildings
Natural ventilation
Issue Date2019
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv
Citation
Building and Environment, 2019, v. 153, p. 218-233 How to Cite?
AbstractA novel holistic framework was established using Building Information Modelling (BIM) to estimate accurately the potential of natural ventilation of residential high-rise buildings. This framework integrates Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation, multi-zone-air-flow modelling, and Building Energy Simulation (BES) to calculate ventilation rates under the mechanisms of wind-, buoyancy- and wind and buoyancy-driven ventilation. The framework was applied to a 40-storey residential building in Hong Kong for stimating the potential of natural ventilation in residential high-rise buildings. The results show that the building can save up to 25% of the electricity consumption if the building employs wind-driven natural ventilation instead of mechanical ventilation. The electricity consumption can be further reduced up to 45% by facilitating the buoyancy-driven natural ventilation. However, natural ventilation is found to be effective only if the temperature difference between indoor and outdoor is less than 2 °C. The study suggests to orienting residential high-rise buildings at an oblique angle with the prevalent wind direction than positioning perpendicular to the prevalent wind direction. Furthermore, the framework recommends promoting the wind-driven natural ventilation at top floors of residential high-rise buildings and to facilitate wind and buoyancy-driven natural ventilation at middle and lower floors of the buildings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273898
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.971
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.121
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWeerasuriya, AU-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, X-
dc.contributor.authorGan, VJL-
dc.contributor.authorTan, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T14:50:53Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T14:50:53Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBuilding and Environment, 2019, v. 153, p. 218-233-
dc.identifier.issn0360-1323-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273898-
dc.description.abstractA novel holistic framework was established using Building Information Modelling (BIM) to estimate accurately the potential of natural ventilation of residential high-rise buildings. This framework integrates Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation, multi-zone-air-flow modelling, and Building Energy Simulation (BES) to calculate ventilation rates under the mechanisms of wind-, buoyancy- and wind and buoyancy-driven ventilation. The framework was applied to a 40-storey residential building in Hong Kong for stimating the potential of natural ventilation in residential high-rise buildings. The results show that the building can save up to 25% of the electricity consumption if the building employs wind-driven natural ventilation instead of mechanical ventilation. The electricity consumption can be further reduced up to 45% by facilitating the buoyancy-driven natural ventilation. However, natural ventilation is found to be effective only if the temperature difference between indoor and outdoor is less than 2 °C. The study suggests to orienting residential high-rise buildings at an oblique angle with the prevalent wind direction than positioning perpendicular to the prevalent wind direction. Furthermore, the framework recommends promoting the wind-driven natural ventilation at top floors of residential high-rise buildings and to facilitate wind and buoyancy-driven natural ventilation at middle and lower floors of the buildings.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/buildenv-
dc.relation.ispartofBuilding and Environment-
dc.subjectBuilding information modelling-
dc.subjectComputational fluid dynamics-
dc.subjectEnergy efficiency-
dc.subjectHigh-rise buildings-
dc.subjectNatural ventilation-
dc.titleA holistic framework to utilize natural ventilation to optimize energy performance of residential high-rise buildings-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWeerasuriya, AU: asiriuw@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.buildenv.2019.02.027-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85062462036-
dc.identifier.hkuros301624-
dc.identifier.volume153-
dc.identifier.spage218-
dc.identifier.epage233-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000461457500019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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