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Article: Global Consultation on Cancer Staging: promoting consistent understanding and use

TitleGlobal Consultation on Cancer Staging: promoting consistent understanding and use
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nrclinonc/index.html
Citation
Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, 2019, Epub How to Cite?
AbstractDisease burden is the most important determinant of survival in patients with cancer. This domain, reflected by the cancer stage and codified using the tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) classification, is a fundamental determinant of prognosis. Accurate and consistent tumour classification is required for the development and use of treatment guidelines and to enable clinical research (including clinical trials), cancer surveillance and control. Furthermore, knowledge of the extent and stage of disease is frequently important in the context of translational studies. Attempts to include additional prognostic factors in staging classifications, in order to facilitate a more accurate determination of prognosis, are often made with a lack of knowledge and understanding and are one of the main causes of the inconsistent use of terms and definitions. This effect has resulted in uncertainty and confusion, thus limiting the utility of the TNM classification. In this Position paper, we provide a consensus on the optimal use and terminology for cancer staging that emerged from a consultation process involving representatives of several major international organizations involved in cancer classification. The consultation involved several steps: a focused literature review; a stakeholder survey; and a consultation meeting. This aim of this Position paper is to provide a consensus that should guide the use of staging terminology and secure the classification of anatomical disease extent as a distinct aspect of cancer classification. © 2019, Springer Nature Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273859
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 24.653
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.498

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBrierley, J-
dc.contributor.authorO’Sullivan, B-
dc.contributor.authorAsamura, H-
dc.contributor.authorByrd, D-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, SH-
dc.contributor.authorLee, A-
dc.contributor.authorPiñeros, M-
dc.contributor.authorMason, M-
dc.contributor.authorMoraes, FY-
dc.contributor.authorRösler, W-
dc.contributor.authorRous, B-
dc.contributor.authorTorode, J-
dc.contributor.authorvan Krieken, JH-
dc.contributor.authorGospodarowicz, M-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T14:50:04Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T14:50:04Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationNature Reviews Clinical Oncology, 2019, Epub-
dc.identifier.issn1759-4774-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273859-
dc.description.abstractDisease burden is the most important determinant of survival in patients with cancer. This domain, reflected by the cancer stage and codified using the tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) classification, is a fundamental determinant of prognosis. Accurate and consistent tumour classification is required for the development and use of treatment guidelines and to enable clinical research (including clinical trials), cancer surveillance and control. Furthermore, knowledge of the extent and stage of disease is frequently important in the context of translational studies. Attempts to include additional prognostic factors in staging classifications, in order to facilitate a more accurate determination of prognosis, are often made with a lack of knowledge and understanding and are one of the main causes of the inconsistent use of terms and definitions. This effect has resulted in uncertainty and confusion, thus limiting the utility of the TNM classification. In this Position paper, we provide a consensus on the optimal use and terminology for cancer staging that emerged from a consultation process involving representatives of several major international organizations involved in cancer classification. The consultation involved several steps: a focused literature review; a stakeholder survey; and a consultation meeting. This aim of this Position paper is to provide a consensus that should guide the use of staging terminology and secure the classification of anatomical disease extent as a distinct aspect of cancer classification. © 2019, Springer Nature Limited.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nrclinonc/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofNature Reviews Clinical Oncology-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology]. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/[10.1038/s41571-019-0253-x]-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleGlobal Consultation on Cancer Staging: promoting consistent understanding and use-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, A: awmlee@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, A=rp02056-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41571-019-0253-x-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85070416981-
dc.identifier.hkuros302198-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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