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Article: Application of Human‐Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) to Study Synaptopathy of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

TitleApplication of Human‐Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) to Study Synaptopathy of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Authors
KeywordsSynaptognenesis
Human‐induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)
autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
schizophrenia (SCZ)
Issue Date2019
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/31737
Citation
Developmental Neurobiology, 2019, v. 79 n. 1, p. 20-35 How to Cite?
AbstractSynapses are the basic structural and functional units for information processing and storage in the brain. Their diverse properties and functions ultimately underlie the complexity of human behavior. Proper development and maintenance of synapses are essential for normal functioning of the nervous system. Disruption in synaptogenesis and the consequent alteration in synaptic function have been strongly implicated to cause neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and schizophrenia (SCZ). The introduction of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides a new path to elucidate disease mechanisms and potential therapies. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and limitations of using hiPSC-derived neurons to study synaptic disorders. Many mutations in genes encoding for proteins that regulate synaptogenesis have been identified in patients with ASDs and SCZ. We use Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2), SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3) and Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) as examples to illustrate the promise of using hiPSCs as cellular models to elucidate the mechanisms underlying disease-related synaptopathy.
DescriptionLink to Free access
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272725
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.598
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.844

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShen, X-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, HT-
dc.contributor.authorLai, KO-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:15:23Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:15:23Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationDevelopmental Neurobiology, 2019, v. 79 n. 1, p. 20-35-
dc.identifier.issn1932-8451-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272725-
dc.descriptionLink to Free access-
dc.description.abstractSynapses are the basic structural and functional units for information processing and storage in the brain. Their diverse properties and functions ultimately underlie the complexity of human behavior. Proper development and maintenance of synapses are essential for normal functioning of the nervous system. Disruption in synaptogenesis and the consequent alteration in synaptic function have been strongly implicated to cause neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and schizophrenia (SCZ). The introduction of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provides a new path to elucidate disease mechanisms and potential therapies. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and limitations of using hiPSC-derived neurons to study synaptic disorders. Many mutations in genes encoding for proteins that regulate synaptogenesis have been identified in patients with ASDs and SCZ. We use Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2), SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (SHANK3) and Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) as examples to illustrate the promise of using hiPSCs as cellular models to elucidate the mechanisms underlying disease-related synaptopathy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/31737-
dc.relation.ispartofDevelopmental Neurobiology-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectSynaptognenesis-
dc.subjectHuman‐induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs)-
dc.subjectautism spectrum disorder (ASD)-
dc.subjectschizophrenia (SCZ)-
dc.titleApplication of Human‐Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (hiPSCs) to Study Synaptopathy of Neurodevelopmental Disorders-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailShen, X: xtshen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLai, KO: laiko@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLai, KO=rp01891-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/dneu.22644-
dc.identifier.pmid30304570-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85055290276-
dc.identifier.hkuros299782-
dc.identifier.volume79-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage20-
dc.identifier.epage35-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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