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Article: Human behavior during close contact in a graduate student office

TitleHuman behavior during close contact in a graduate student office
Authors
Keywordsclose contact
gesture and posture
head and body movement
human behavior
relative position
Issue Date2019
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA
Citation
Indoor Air, 2019, v. 29 n. 4, p. 577-590 How to Cite?
AbstractClose contact is a part of daily life, and proximity is known to play a primary role in the transmission of many respiratory infections. However, there are no data on close contact parameters such as movement of the head/body and relative location, which can affect both expiration and inspiration flows. Using video cameras, we collected such data for nearly 63 000 seconds of total close contact duration in a graduate student office in Beijing, China. Each student had on average 9.6 close contacts per hour and spent 9.9% of their time participating in close contact interactions. Males made more body/head movements than females during close contact. The probability distribution of interpersonal distance follows a log‐normal distribution. The average interpersonal distance was 0.67 m. Students preferred a relative face orientation angle between 15° and 45°. When the relative face orientation angle increased, the interpersonal distance increased. Students had a high probability (73%‐97%) of maintaining their head, body, and relative position during close contact, while the probability of body/head or relative position changing from any location/angle to another is also given. These data may be used for assessment of infection risk via close contact in crowded indoor environments.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272222
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.396
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.666

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, N-
dc.contributor.authorTang, JW-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-20T10:38:04Z-
dc.date.available2019-07-20T10:38:04Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationIndoor Air, 2019, v. 29 n. 4, p. 577-590-
dc.identifier.issn0905-6947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272222-
dc.description.abstractClose contact is a part of daily life, and proximity is known to play a primary role in the transmission of many respiratory infections. However, there are no data on close contact parameters such as movement of the head/body and relative location, which can affect both expiration and inspiration flows. Using video cameras, we collected such data for nearly 63 000 seconds of total close contact duration in a graduate student office in Beijing, China. Each student had on average 9.6 close contacts per hour and spent 9.9% of their time participating in close contact interactions. Males made more body/head movements than females during close contact. The probability distribution of interpersonal distance follows a log‐normal distribution. The average interpersonal distance was 0.67 m. Students preferred a relative face orientation angle between 15° and 45°. When the relative face orientation angle increased, the interpersonal distance increased. Students had a high probability (73%‐97%) of maintaining their head, body, and relative position during close contact, while the probability of body/head or relative position changing from any location/angle to another is also given. These data may be used for assessment of infection risk via close contact in crowded indoor environments.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA-
dc.relation.ispartofIndoor Air-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectclose contact-
dc.subjectgesture and posture-
dc.subjecthead and body movement-
dc.subjecthuman behavior-
dc.subjectrelative position-
dc.titleHuman behavior during close contact in a graduate student office-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, N: zhangnan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y: liyg@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp00151-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ina.12554-
dc.identifier.pmid30908707-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85064483524-
dc.identifier.hkuros298817-
dc.identifier.volume29-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage577-
dc.identifier.epage590-
dc.publisher.placeDenmark-

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