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Article: The relative effects of determinants on Chinese adults’ decision for influenza vaccination choice: What is the effect of priming?

TitleThe relative effects of determinants on Chinese adults’ decision for influenza vaccination choice: What is the effect of priming?
Authors
KeywordsInfluenza vaccination
Preference
Priming
Risk judgment
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/vaccine
Citation
Vaccine, 2019, v. 37 n. 30, p. 4124-4132 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To assess the relative effects of altering different factors (attributes) related to adults’ decision for influenza vaccination choice, and whether priming modifies these relative effects. Methods: Chinese adults were randomly allocated to either a control condition (non-risk related video), or one of the three health risk-priming conditions (disease (influenza) risk video, intervention (vaccine) risk video, or non-specific (air pollution) risk video), each comprising ∼200 participants, prior to a discrete choice experiment survey. Mixed logit modelling estimated the relative effects of pre-determined attributes influencing vaccination choice. Results: Across all four conditions, for determining vaccination choice, Vaccine Efficacy had a greater effect than social cues (community vaccination coverage rate (CVCR) and doctors’ advice) but social cues can compensate for the effect of “uncertain” vaccine safety; influenza case-fatality ratio (CFR) became dominantly important among all included attributes when it reached 20%; vaccination preference increased when a CVCR changed incrementally from 5% to 60% but declined thereafter when the CVCR reached 80%. Compared with Control participants, a CVCR increased by 80% had a smaller effect for participants primed by intervention risk on vaccination choice, while the effect of influenza risk relative to vaccine risk increased following disease risk priming. Conclusion: While increasing confidence on vaccine efficacy is more important for influenza with less severe consequences, highlighting disease consequences becomes increasingly important when its CFR increases, for promoting vaccination uptake. For a new vaccine with uncertain safety, involving doctors and early vaccine takers to validate vaccine safety should be important. Brief exposure to influenza/vaccine risk didn’t increase the effect of specific risk on vaccination choice but may change the relative weight of disease versus intervention risk when individuals make trade-off for vaccination decision. Free riding on herd immunity may increase when community vaccination coverage is high particularly following intervention risk priming.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/271172
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.285
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.044

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiao, Q-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WWT-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKH-
dc.contributor.authorLam, C-
dc.contributor.authorChen, J-
dc.contributor.authorFielding, R-
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-24T01:04:43Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-24T01:04:43Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationVaccine, 2019, v. 37 n. 30, p. 4124-4132-
dc.identifier.issn0264-410X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/271172-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To assess the relative effects of altering different factors (attributes) related to adults’ decision for influenza vaccination choice, and whether priming modifies these relative effects. Methods: Chinese adults were randomly allocated to either a control condition (non-risk related video), or one of the three health risk-priming conditions (disease (influenza) risk video, intervention (vaccine) risk video, or non-specific (air pollution) risk video), each comprising ∼200 participants, prior to a discrete choice experiment survey. Mixed logit modelling estimated the relative effects of pre-determined attributes influencing vaccination choice. Results: Across all four conditions, for determining vaccination choice, Vaccine Efficacy had a greater effect than social cues (community vaccination coverage rate (CVCR) and doctors’ advice) but social cues can compensate for the effect of “uncertain” vaccine safety; influenza case-fatality ratio (CFR) became dominantly important among all included attributes when it reached 20%; vaccination preference increased when a CVCR changed incrementally from 5% to 60% but declined thereafter when the CVCR reached 80%. Compared with Control participants, a CVCR increased by 80% had a smaller effect for participants primed by intervention risk on vaccination choice, while the effect of influenza risk relative to vaccine risk increased following disease risk priming. Conclusion: While increasing confidence on vaccine efficacy is more important for influenza with less severe consequences, highlighting disease consequences becomes increasingly important when its CFR increases, for promoting vaccination uptake. For a new vaccine with uncertain safety, involving doctors and early vaccine takers to validate vaccine safety should be important. Brief exposure to influenza/vaccine risk didn’t increase the effect of specific risk on vaccination choice but may change the relative weight of disease versus intervention risk when individuals make trade-off for vaccination decision. Free riding on herd immunity may increase when community vaccination coverage is high particularly following intervention risk priming.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/vaccine-
dc.relation.ispartofVaccine-
dc.subjectInfluenza vaccination-
dc.subjectPreference-
dc.subjectPriming-
dc.subjectRisk judgment-
dc.titleThe relative effects of determinants on Chinese adults’ decision for influenza vaccination choice: What is the effect of priming?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLiao, Q: qyliao11@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WWT: wwtlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CKH: carlosho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, C: cylam1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, J: pianogal@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R: fielding@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLiao, Q=rp02100-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, WWT=rp00443-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CKH=rp01931-
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.05.072-
dc.identifier.pmid31186189-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85066925107-
dc.identifier.hkuros298102-
dc.identifier.volume37-
dc.identifier.issue30-
dc.identifier.spage4124-
dc.identifier.epage4132-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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