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Article: All-cause and cause-specific mortality from restrictive and obstructive spirometric patterns in Chinese adults with and without dyspnea: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study

TitleAll-cause and cause-specific mortality from restrictive and obstructive spirometric patterns in Chinese adults with and without dyspnea: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study
Authors
KeywordsRestriction on spirometry
Airflow obstruction
Dyspnea
Mortality
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rmed
Citation
Respiratory Medicine, 2019, v. 151, p. 66-80 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To study whether abnormal spirometric patterns were associated with differential mortality in Chinese adults with and without dyspnea. Methods; Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS) participants were classified by spirometric patterns and presence of dyspnea into 6 groups: normal spirometry (NS), restriction on spirometry (ROS) and airflow obstruction (AO), each with and without dyspnea. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were calculated for mortality using Cox models. Results: Among 16777 subjects, 1595 (9.5%) had ROS, 1036 (6.2%) had AO and 1009 (6.0%) had dyspnea. A total of 1993 deaths (11.9%) occurred during 11-year follow-up. Using NS without dyspnea as reference, NS with dyspnea was significantly associated with increased cardiovascular mortality risk (aHRs 1.61 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18–2.19); ROS with and without dyspnea were associated with increased risks of all-cause (aHRs 1.46 (95% CI 1.28–1.66) and 1.81 (95% CI 1.33–2.47)) and cardiovascular mortality (aHRs 1.89 (95% CI 1.55–2.31) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.12–3.03)), but not of lung cancer mortality (aHRs 1.33 (95% CI 0.91–1.94) and 1.35 (95% CI 0.49–3.70)); AO with and without dyspnea were associated with increased risks of all-cause (aHRs 1.59 (95% CI 1.36–1.86) and 2.36 (95% CI 1.77–3.15)), cardiovascular (aHRs 1.43 (95% CI 1.08–1.90) and 1.61 (95% CI 0.91–2.82)) and lung cancer mortality (aHRs 1.91 (95% CI 1.29–2.84) and 3.01 (95% CI 1.46–6.23)). These associations did not vary by sex or smoking status (all P-values for interaction >0.05). Conclusion: Both ROS and AO, with and without dyspnea, were associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. The increased risk of all-cause was greater and that of cardiovascular mortality was lower for AO than ROS. AO showed significantly increased risk of lung cancer but ROS did not. (272 words).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/271168
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.23
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.396

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPan, J-
dc.contributor.authorAdab, P-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, CQ-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, WS-
dc.contributor.authorZhu, F-
dc.contributor.authorJin, YL-
dc.contributor.authorThomas, GN-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-24T01:04:39Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-24T01:04:39Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationRespiratory Medicine, 2019, v. 151, p. 66-80-
dc.identifier.issn0954-6111-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/271168-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To study whether abnormal spirometric patterns were associated with differential mortality in Chinese adults with and without dyspnea. Methods; Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (GBCS) participants were classified by spirometric patterns and presence of dyspnea into 6 groups: normal spirometry (NS), restriction on spirometry (ROS) and airflow obstruction (AO), each with and without dyspnea. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were calculated for mortality using Cox models. Results: Among 16777 subjects, 1595 (9.5%) had ROS, 1036 (6.2%) had AO and 1009 (6.0%) had dyspnea. A total of 1993 deaths (11.9%) occurred during 11-year follow-up. Using NS without dyspnea as reference, NS with dyspnea was significantly associated with increased cardiovascular mortality risk (aHRs 1.61 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18–2.19); ROS with and without dyspnea were associated with increased risks of all-cause (aHRs 1.46 (95% CI 1.28–1.66) and 1.81 (95% CI 1.33–2.47)) and cardiovascular mortality (aHRs 1.89 (95% CI 1.55–2.31) and 1.85 (95% CI 1.12–3.03)), but not of lung cancer mortality (aHRs 1.33 (95% CI 0.91–1.94) and 1.35 (95% CI 0.49–3.70)); AO with and without dyspnea were associated with increased risks of all-cause (aHRs 1.59 (95% CI 1.36–1.86) and 2.36 (95% CI 1.77–3.15)), cardiovascular (aHRs 1.43 (95% CI 1.08–1.90) and 1.61 (95% CI 0.91–2.82)) and lung cancer mortality (aHRs 1.91 (95% CI 1.29–2.84) and 3.01 (95% CI 1.46–6.23)). These associations did not vary by sex or smoking status (all P-values for interaction >0.05). Conclusion: Both ROS and AO, with and without dyspnea, were associated with increased all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality. The increased risk of all-cause was greater and that of cardiovascular mortality was lower for AO than ROS. AO showed significantly increased risk of lung cancer but ROS did not. (272 words).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rmed-
dc.relation.ispartofRespiratory Medicine-
dc.subjectRestriction on spirometry-
dc.subjectAirflow obstruction-
dc.subjectDyspnea-
dc.subjectMortality-
dc.titleAll-cause and cause-specific mortality from restrictive and obstructive spirometric patterns in Chinese adults with and without dyspnea: Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJiang, CQ: cqjiang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, WS: zhangws9@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailThomas, GN: neilt@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rmed.2019.04.002-
dc.identifier.pmid31047120-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85063966300-
dc.identifier.hkuros297886-
dc.identifier.volume151-
dc.identifier.spage66-
dc.identifier.epage80-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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