File Download
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: The effect of conscious control on movement automaticity

TitleThe effect of conscious control on movement automaticity
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Ginneken, W. F.. (2017). The effect of conscious control on movement automaticity. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThis thesis presents four experiments aimed at testing whether conscious control decreases movement automaticity. Although the term “movement automaticity” is often used in the motor control literature, it is seldom measured in experiments that examine the role of conscious control in movement. A possible reason for this lack of operationalization is that the experiments are based on dualistic assumptions. These assumptions prescribe that conscious control and movement automaticity can be operationalized based on the same phenomena. That is, any increase in conscious control is taken to simultaneously indicate a decrease in movement automaticity. Although this may make intuitive sense, it entails that the hypothesis that conscious control decreases movement automaticity is accepted before it is tested. To test the hypothesis more objectively, a separate measure of movement automaticity is needed. To derive such an independent operationalization of movement automaticity, this thesis draws on existential phenomenology, rather than dualism. This change in perspective makes it possible to define movement automaticity as background corrections. When movements are ongoing, these background corrections occur beyond the grasp of conscious control and therefore represent movement automaticity. The subsequent 4 experiments present progressive steps toward testing the hypothesis that conscious control decreases movement automaticity. The first experiment investigates whether different methods of studying conscious control should be combined or used separately. The second, third and fourth experiment investigate the association between conscious control and three measures related to movement automaticity: movement variability, between-trial functional variability and within-trial functional variability, respectively. Results of these experiments provide partial support for the notions that movement automaticity may be operationalized as within-trial functional variability and that conscious control may decrease movement automaticity.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectControl (Psychology)
Motor ability - Psychological aspects
Movement, Psychology of
Dept/ProgramPublic Health
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/270234

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGinneken, Wouter Frans van-
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-23T02:26:16Z-
dc.date.available2019-05-23T02:26:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationGinneken, W. F.. (2017). The effect of conscious control on movement automaticity. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/270234-
dc.description.abstractThis thesis presents four experiments aimed at testing whether conscious control decreases movement automaticity. Although the term “movement automaticity” is often used in the motor control literature, it is seldom measured in experiments that examine the role of conscious control in movement. A possible reason for this lack of operationalization is that the experiments are based on dualistic assumptions. These assumptions prescribe that conscious control and movement automaticity can be operationalized based on the same phenomena. That is, any increase in conscious control is taken to simultaneously indicate a decrease in movement automaticity. Although this may make intuitive sense, it entails that the hypothesis that conscious control decreases movement automaticity is accepted before it is tested. To test the hypothesis more objectively, a separate measure of movement automaticity is needed. To derive such an independent operationalization of movement automaticity, this thesis draws on existential phenomenology, rather than dualism. This change in perspective makes it possible to define movement automaticity as background corrections. When movements are ongoing, these background corrections occur beyond the grasp of conscious control and therefore represent movement automaticity. The subsequent 4 experiments present progressive steps toward testing the hypothesis that conscious control decreases movement automaticity. The first experiment investigates whether different methods of studying conscious control should be combined or used separately. The second, third and fourth experiment investigate the association between conscious control and three measures related to movement automaticity: movement variability, between-trial functional variability and within-trial functional variability, respectively. Results of these experiments provide partial support for the notions that movement automaticity may be operationalized as within-trial functional variability and that conscious control may decrease movement automaticity. -
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshControl (Psychology)-
dc.subject.lcshMotor ability - Psychological aspects-
dc.subject.lcshMovement, Psychology of-
dc.titleThe effect of conscious control on movement automaticity-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePublic Health-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2018-
dc.identifier.mmsid991044104149003414-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats