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Article: Trust Ecologies and Channel Complementarity for Information Seeking in Cancer Prevention

TitleTrust Ecologies and Channel Complementarity for Information Seeking in Cancer Prevention
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/10810730.asp
Citation
Journal of Health Communication: international perspectives, 2018, v. 23 n. 3, p. 254-263 How to Cite?
AbstractOur paper extends channel complementarity theory, which has focused on evidence of complementarity and patterns of channel use, by elucidating the notion of trust complementarity. We examined trust, an information-carrier characteristic and a core construct in health-focused decision-making to understand cancer information seeking, based on data from two nationally representative surveys in Singapore. Trust is found to be differential, relational, and ecological, with implications for individuals' access to and reliance on doctors, family/friends, newspapers/magazines, radio, TV, and the Internet for cancer prevention information. In an ideal trust complementarity environment, an individual should be able to traverse a range of communication channels seamlessly. Our findings however suggest that although individuals trust different channels complementarily, their trust patterns are limited and fettered. We identified two types of trust ecologies shaped by dual-channel and polymorphic complementarity patterns that suggest that health information seekers are trapped within specific trust ecologies that prevent them from navigating a broader range of communication channels for cancer prevention.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/270143
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.648
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.160
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, ST-
dc.contributor.authorDutta, MJ-
dc.contributor.authorLin, J-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, P-
dc.contributor.authorKaur-Gill, S-
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-20T05:10:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-05-20T05:10:28Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Health Communication: international perspectives, 2018, v. 23 n. 3, p. 254-263-
dc.identifier.issn1081-0730-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/270143-
dc.description.abstractOur paper extends channel complementarity theory, which has focused on evidence of complementarity and patterns of channel use, by elucidating the notion of trust complementarity. We examined trust, an information-carrier characteristic and a core construct in health-focused decision-making to understand cancer information seeking, based on data from two nationally representative surveys in Singapore. Trust is found to be differential, relational, and ecological, with implications for individuals' access to and reliance on doctors, family/friends, newspapers/magazines, radio, TV, and the Internet for cancer prevention information. In an ideal trust complementarity environment, an individual should be able to traverse a range of communication channels seamlessly. Our findings however suggest that although individuals trust different channels complementarily, their trust patterns are limited and fettered. We identified two types of trust ecologies shaped by dual-channel and polymorphic complementarity patterns that suggest that health information seekers are trapped within specific trust ecologies that prevent them from navigating a broader range of communication channels for cancer prevention.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/10810730.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Health Communication: international perspectives-
dc.titleTrust Ecologies and Channel Complementarity for Information Seeking in Cancer Prevention-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLuk, P: pluk@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10810730.2018.1433253-
dc.identifier.pmid29436966-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85041926272-
dc.identifier.hkuros297680-
dc.identifier.volume23-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage254-
dc.identifier.epage263-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000427882500003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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