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Article: The Dynamics of Benthic Respiration at a Mid-Shelf Station Off Oregon

TitleThe Dynamics of Benthic Respiration at a Mid-Shelf Station Off Oregon
Authors
KeywordsEddy covariance
Deepwater waves
Benthic fluxes
Sediment oxygen consumption
Oregon shelf
Issue Date2016
Citation
Aquatic Geochemistry, 2016, v. 22, n. 5-6, p. 505-527 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Mid-shelf sediments off the Oregon coast are characterized as fine sands that trap and remineralize phytodetritus leading to the consumption of significant quantities of dissolved oxygen. Sediment oxygen consumption (SOC) can be delayed from seasonal organic matter inputs because of a transient buildup of reduced constituents during periods of quiescent physical processes. Between 2009 and 2013, benthic oxygen exchange rates were measured using the noninvasive eddy covariance (EC) method five separate times at a single 80-m station. Ancillary measurements included in situ microprofiles of oxygen at the sediment–water interface, and concentration profiles of pore water nutrients and trace metals, and solid-phase organic C and sulfide minerals from cores. Sediment cores were also incubated to derive anaerobic respiration rates. The EC measurements were made during spring, summer, and fall conditions, and they produced average benthic oxygen flux estimates that varied between −2 and −15 mmol m−2 d−1. The EC oxygen fluxes were most highly correlated with bottom-sensed, significant wave heights (Hs). The relationship with Hs was used with an annual record of deepwater swell heights to predict an integrated oxygen consumption rate for the mid-shelf of 1.5 mol m−2 for the upwelling season (May–September) and 6.8 mol m−2 y−1. The annual prediction requires that SOC rates are enhanced in the winter because of sand filtering and pore water advection under large waves, and it counters budgets that assume a dominance of organic matter export from the shelf. Refined budgets will require winter flux measurements and observations from cross-shelf transects over multiple years.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269751
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.418
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.764

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorReimers, Clare E.-
dc.contributor.authorÖzkan-Haller, H. Tuba-
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Rhea D.-
dc.contributor.authorMcCann-Grosvenor, Kristina-
dc.contributor.authorChace, Peter J.-
dc.contributor.authorCrowe, Sean A.-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-30T01:49:29Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-30T01:49:29Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationAquatic Geochemistry, 2016, v. 22, n. 5-6, p. 505-527-
dc.identifier.issn1380-6165-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269751-
dc.description.abstract© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Mid-shelf sediments off the Oregon coast are characterized as fine sands that trap and remineralize phytodetritus leading to the consumption of significant quantities of dissolved oxygen. Sediment oxygen consumption (SOC) can be delayed from seasonal organic matter inputs because of a transient buildup of reduced constituents during periods of quiescent physical processes. Between 2009 and 2013, benthic oxygen exchange rates were measured using the noninvasive eddy covariance (EC) method five separate times at a single 80-m station. Ancillary measurements included in situ microprofiles of oxygen at the sediment–water interface, and concentration profiles of pore water nutrients and trace metals, and solid-phase organic C and sulfide minerals from cores. Sediment cores were also incubated to derive anaerobic respiration rates. The EC measurements were made during spring, summer, and fall conditions, and they produced average benthic oxygen flux estimates that varied between −2 and −15 mmol m−2 d−1. The EC oxygen fluxes were most highly correlated with bottom-sensed, significant wave heights (Hs). The relationship with Hs was used with an annual record of deepwater swell heights to predict an integrated oxygen consumption rate for the mid-shelf of 1.5 mol m−2 for the upwelling season (May–September) and 6.8 mol m−2 y−1. The annual prediction requires that SOC rates are enhanced in the winter because of sand filtering and pore water advection under large waves, and it counters budgets that assume a dominance of organic matter export from the shelf. Refined budgets will require winter flux measurements and observations from cross-shelf transects over multiple years.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofAquatic Geochemistry-
dc.subjectEddy covariance-
dc.subjectDeepwater waves-
dc.subjectBenthic fluxes-
dc.subjectSediment oxygen consumption-
dc.subjectOregon shelf-
dc.titleThe Dynamics of Benthic Respiration at a Mid-Shelf Station Off Oregon-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10498-016-9303-5-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84988715575-
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issue5-6-
dc.identifier.spage505-
dc.identifier.epage527-
dc.identifier.eissn1573-1421-

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