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Article: Sediment geochemistry and contributions to carbon and nutrient cycling in a deep meromictic tropical lake: Lake Malawi (East Africa)

TitleSediment geochemistry and contributions to carbon and nutrient cycling in a deep meromictic tropical lake: Lake Malawi (East Africa)
Authors
KeywordsLake Malawi
Nutrient budgets
Sediments
Carbon cycle
Issue Date2018
Citation
Journal of Great Lakes Research, 2018, v. 44, n. 6, p. 1221-1234 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2017 International Association for Great Lakes Research. The biogeochemical functioning of large tropical lakes differs substantially from temperate lakes, yet remains poorly understood. We characterized the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling in the water column and sediments of a deep meromictic tropical Lake Malawi (East Africa) by measuring geochemical distributions and compiling whole-lake geochemical budgets. Four locations (100 to 650 m water depth) were characterized. The results reveal that sediments contribute significantly to lake-wide biogeochemical budgets. Sedimentation rates have significantly increased in recent decades. While the export efficiency of organic matter from photic zone to deep sediments is low (14%), organic carbon is buried in the anoxic sediments with high efficiency (27–46%). Area-specific rates of carbon mineralization (4.1 mmol m− 2 d− 1) are similar to those in temperate well-oxygenated large lakes and marine sediments in similar water depths. Ammonium effluxes from sediments (0.44 mmol m− 2 d− 1) contribute 29% to the total nitrogen inputs into the water column, while sediment denitrification (0.035 mmol m− 2 d− 1) and burial of organic nitrogen (0.27 mmol m− 2 d− 1) remove 28% of total inputs in the lake. The recycling efficiency of phosphorus in anoxic sediments is high (73%). P effluxes average 0.037 mmol m− 2 d− 1, suggesting a large and previously unquantified contribution (42%) to water column P inputs. The results underscore the importance of sediments in the geochemical budgets of even large lakes and suggest trends in lacustrine carbon cycling that hold across a wide range of environments.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269651
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.354
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.932

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jiying-
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Erik T.-
dc.contributor.authorCrowe, Sean A.-
dc.contributor.authorKatsev, Sergei-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-30T01:49:11Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-30T01:49:11Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Great Lakes Research, 2018, v. 44, n. 6, p. 1221-1234-
dc.identifier.issn0380-1330-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269651-
dc.description.abstract© 2017 International Association for Great Lakes Research. The biogeochemical functioning of large tropical lakes differs substantially from temperate lakes, yet remains poorly understood. We characterized the carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling in the water column and sediments of a deep meromictic tropical Lake Malawi (East Africa) by measuring geochemical distributions and compiling whole-lake geochemical budgets. Four locations (100 to 650 m water depth) were characterized. The results reveal that sediments contribute significantly to lake-wide biogeochemical budgets. Sedimentation rates have significantly increased in recent decades. While the export efficiency of organic matter from photic zone to deep sediments is low (14%), organic carbon is buried in the anoxic sediments with high efficiency (27–46%). Area-specific rates of carbon mineralization (4.1 mmol m− 2 d− 1) are similar to those in temperate well-oxygenated large lakes and marine sediments in similar water depths. Ammonium effluxes from sediments (0.44 mmol m− 2 d− 1) contribute 29% to the total nitrogen inputs into the water column, while sediment denitrification (0.035 mmol m− 2 d− 1) and burial of organic nitrogen (0.27 mmol m− 2 d− 1) remove 28% of total inputs in the lake. The recycling efficiency of phosphorus in anoxic sediments is high (73%). P effluxes average 0.037 mmol m− 2 d− 1, suggesting a large and previously unquantified contribution (42%) to water column P inputs. The results underscore the importance of sediments in the geochemical budgets of even large lakes and suggest trends in lacustrine carbon cycling that hold across a wide range of environments.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Great Lakes Research-
dc.subjectLake Malawi-
dc.subjectNutrient budgets-
dc.subjectSediments-
dc.subjectCarbon cycle-
dc.titleSediment geochemistry and contributions to carbon and nutrient cycling in a deep meromictic tropical lake: Lake Malawi (East Africa)-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jglr.2017.12.001-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85039837814-
dc.identifier.volume44-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1221-
dc.identifier.epage1234-

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