File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Absence of adaptive evolution is the main barrier against influenza emergence in horses in Asia despite frequent virus interspecies transmission from wild birds

TitleAbsence of adaptive evolution is the main barrier against influenza emergence in horses in Asia despite frequent virus interspecies transmission from wild birds
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://pathogens.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=index-html&issn=1553-7374
Citation
PLoS Pathogens, 2019, v. 15 n. 2, article no. e1007531, p. 1-23 How to Cite?
AbstractVirus ecology and evolution play a central role in disease emergence. However, their relative roles will vary depending on the viruses and ecosystems involved. We combined field studies, phylogenetics and experimental infections to document with unprecedented detail the stages that precede initial outbreaks during viral emergence in nature. Using serological surveys we showed that in the absence of large-scale outbreaks, horses in Mongolia are routinely exposed to and infected by avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulating among wild birds. Some of those AIVs are genetically related to an avian-origin virus that caused an epizootic in horses in 1989. Experimental infections showed that most AIVs replicate in the equine respiratory tract without causing lesions, explaining the absence of outbreaks of disease. Our results show that AIVs infect horses but do not spread, or they infect and spread but do not cause disease. Thus, the failure of AIVs to evolve greater transmissibility and to cause disease in horses is in this case the main barrier preventing disease emergence.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269363
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 6.158
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.185
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, H-
dc.contributor.authorDamdinjav, B-
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, G-
dc.contributor.authorPatrono, LV-
dc.contributor.authorRamirez-Mendoza, H-
dc.contributor.authorAmat, JAR-
dc.contributor.authorCrispell, J-
dc.contributor.authorParr, YA-
dc.contributor.authorHammond, TA-
dc.contributor.authorShiilegdamba, E-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CYH-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM-
dc.contributor.authorMarshall, JF-
dc.contributor.authorHughes, J-
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, M-
dc.contributor.authorMurcia, PR-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-24T08:06:07Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-24T08:06:07Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS Pathogens, 2019, v. 15 n. 2, article no. e1007531, p. 1-23-
dc.identifier.issn1553-7366-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/269363-
dc.description.abstractVirus ecology and evolution play a central role in disease emergence. However, their relative roles will vary depending on the viruses and ecosystems involved. We combined field studies, phylogenetics and experimental infections to document with unprecedented detail the stages that precede initial outbreaks during viral emergence in nature. Using serological surveys we showed that in the absence of large-scale outbreaks, horses in Mongolia are routinely exposed to and infected by avian influenza viruses (AIVs) circulating among wild birds. Some of those AIVs are genetically related to an avian-origin virus that caused an epizootic in horses in 1989. Experimental infections showed that most AIVs replicate in the equine respiratory tract without causing lesions, explaining the absence of outbreaks of disease. Our results show that AIVs infect horses but do not spread, or they infect and spread but do not cause disease. Thus, the failure of AIVs to evolve greater transmissibility and to cause disease in horses is in this case the main barrier preventing disease emergence.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://pathogens.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=index-html&issn=1553-7374-
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Pathogens-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleAbsence of adaptive evolution is the main barrier against influenza emergence in horses in Asia despite frequent virus interspecies transmission from wild birds-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, CYH: cyhleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, CYH=rp00307-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.ppat.1007531-
dc.identifier.pmid30731004-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6366691-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85061225563-
dc.identifier.hkuros297395-
dc.identifier.volume15-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e1007531, p. 1-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e1007531, p. 23-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000459972100011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats