File Download
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Governing innovation in China : institutions, policies, and outcomes

TitleGoverning innovation in China : institutions, policies, and outcomes
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Chan, KNLam, WF
Issue Date2019
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Zhang, D. [張岱鼎]. (2019). Governing innovation in China : institutions, policies, and outcomes. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractHow does China, an authoritarian regime accustomed to state-directed development, adapt to the challenges of governing the innovation economy? The question begs the puzzle that whether the difference in policies leads to an imbalance in the development of innovation economy. The puzzle is examined from the public policy angle, credit claiming and blame avoidance. To examine how local officials approach innovation economy and what institutional choices they subsequently make to govern the sector, this thesis maps national data and the evolving institutions in Tianjin for innovation economy. This thesis combines both quantitative and qualitative analyses that include observations from macro to micro. In the quantitative analysis, a range of factors representing the innovation environment are independent variables, whereas a range of factors representing the performance of start-ups in provinces are dependent variables. The qualitative analysis portrays in detail how the Tianjin officials’ attitudes – be it credit claiming or blame avoiding – influence local socio-economic conditions and institutions. The finding shows more government expenditure and media exposure significantly contribute to the local mass innovation, which proves government capacity for promoting mass innovation under control. The conclusion of thesis is that credit claiming and blame avoidance is valid framework for studying mass innovation in China. Future research should do more field works to explore unexplained links between local officials’ preference, innovation policies’ quality and the central government’s expectation.
DegreeMaster of Philosophy
SubjectTechnological innovations - Government policy - China
Dept/ProgramPolitics and Public Administration
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268439

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorChan, KN-
dc.contributor.advisorLam, WF-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Daiding-
dc.contributor.author張岱鼎-
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-21T01:40:25Z-
dc.date.available2019-03-21T01:40:25Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationZhang, D. [張岱鼎]. (2019). Governing innovation in China : institutions, policies, and outcomes. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268439-
dc.description.abstractHow does China, an authoritarian regime accustomed to state-directed development, adapt to the challenges of governing the innovation economy? The question begs the puzzle that whether the difference in policies leads to an imbalance in the development of innovation economy. The puzzle is examined from the public policy angle, credit claiming and blame avoidance. To examine how local officials approach innovation economy and what institutional choices they subsequently make to govern the sector, this thesis maps national data and the evolving institutions in Tianjin for innovation economy. This thesis combines both quantitative and qualitative analyses that include observations from macro to micro. In the quantitative analysis, a range of factors representing the innovation environment are independent variables, whereas a range of factors representing the performance of start-ups in provinces are dependent variables. The qualitative analysis portrays in detail how the Tianjin officials’ attitudes – be it credit claiming or blame avoiding – influence local socio-economic conditions and institutions. The finding shows more government expenditure and media exposure significantly contribute to the local mass innovation, which proves government capacity for promoting mass innovation under control. The conclusion of thesis is that credit claiming and blame avoidance is valid framework for studying mass innovation in China. Future research should do more field works to explore unexplained links between local officials’ preference, innovation policies’ quality and the central government’s expectation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshTechnological innovations - Government policy - China-
dc.titleGoverning innovation in China : institutions, policies, and outcomes-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.description.thesisnameMaster of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelMaster-
dc.description.thesisdisciplinePolitics and Public Administration-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2019-
dc.identifier.mmsid991044091305803414-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats