File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: SF-6D utility scores of smokers and ex-smokers with or without respiratory symptoms attending primary care clinics

TitleSF-6D utility scores of smokers and ex-smokers with or without respiratory symptoms attending primary care clinics
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hqlo.com/home/
Citation
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2019, v. 17, p. 48 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: The aim of this paper is to find out generic preference-based Short-Form 6 Dimensions (SF-6D) utility scores of smokers and ex-smokers with varying cigarette exposure, with and without respiratory symptoms. Methods: Seven hundred thirty one people aged ≥30 with a history of smoking who attended 5 public primary care clinics completed a cross-sectional survey using SF-6D utility score, Breathlessness, Cough, and Sputum Scale (BCSS©) and office spirometry. Results: Most of the subjects were men (92.5%) in an older age group (mean age 62.2 ± 11.7 years). About half of them (48.3%) were current smokers while the other half (51.7%) were ex-smokers. More than half of them (54.2%) reported mild respiratory symptoms (mean BCSS score 0.95 ± 1.12). The most common symptoms were sputum (45.1%), followed by cough (34.2%) and breathlessness (6.0%). The SF-6D overall utility score was 0.850 ± 0.106. The subjects reported significantly lower SF-6D scores when they had breathlessness (0.752 ± 0.138; p = < 0.001), cough (0.836 ± 0.107; p = 0.007), sputum (0.838 ± 0.115; p = 0.004) or any of the above symptom (0.837 ± 0.113; p < 0.001). In both groups of current smokers and ex-smokers, there was no statistically significant difference in the scores among light, moderate or heavy smokers. In the Tobit regression model of factors affecting SF-6D utility score, subjects who reported more respiratory symptoms (i.e. higher BCSS©) had lower SF-6D scores (B = − 0.018 ± 0.007, p < 0.001), while men had higher SF-6D scores than women (B = 0.037 ± 0.031, p = 0.019). Subjects who attended middle or high school had higher SF-6D score than those attended the University or above. The presence of airflow obstruction was not associated with the score. Conclusions: The study yielded SF-6D utility scores of smokers and ex-smokers with different reported cigarette exposure, which could be useful in future clinical studies and cost-effectiveness analysis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268175
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.278
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.020

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFU, SN-
dc.contributor.authorDao, MC-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKH-
dc.contributor.authorYu, WC-
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-18T04:20:05Z-
dc.date.available2019-03-18T04:20:05Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationHealth and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2019, v. 17, p. 48-
dc.identifier.issn1477-7525-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268175-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The aim of this paper is to find out generic preference-based Short-Form 6 Dimensions (SF-6D) utility scores of smokers and ex-smokers with varying cigarette exposure, with and without respiratory symptoms. Methods: Seven hundred thirty one people aged ≥30 with a history of smoking who attended 5 public primary care clinics completed a cross-sectional survey using SF-6D utility score, Breathlessness, Cough, and Sputum Scale (BCSS©) and office spirometry. Results: Most of the subjects were men (92.5%) in an older age group (mean age 62.2 ± 11.7 years). About half of them (48.3%) were current smokers while the other half (51.7%) were ex-smokers. More than half of them (54.2%) reported mild respiratory symptoms (mean BCSS score 0.95 ± 1.12). The most common symptoms were sputum (45.1%), followed by cough (34.2%) and breathlessness (6.0%). The SF-6D overall utility score was 0.850 ± 0.106. The subjects reported significantly lower SF-6D scores when they had breathlessness (0.752 ± 0.138; p = < 0.001), cough (0.836 ± 0.107; p = 0.007), sputum (0.838 ± 0.115; p = 0.004) or any of the above symptom (0.837 ± 0.113; p < 0.001). In both groups of current smokers and ex-smokers, there was no statistically significant difference in the scores among light, moderate or heavy smokers. In the Tobit regression model of factors affecting SF-6D utility score, subjects who reported more respiratory symptoms (i.e. higher BCSS©) had lower SF-6D scores (B = − 0.018 ± 0.007, p < 0.001), while men had higher SF-6D scores than women (B = 0.037 ± 0.031, p = 0.019). Subjects who attended middle or high school had higher SF-6D score than those attended the University or above. The presence of airflow obstruction was not associated with the score. Conclusions: The study yielded SF-6D utility scores of smokers and ex-smokers with different reported cigarette exposure, which could be useful in future clinical studies and cost-effectiveness analysis.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hqlo.com/home/-
dc.relation.ispartofHealth and Quality of Life Outcomes-
dc.rightsHealth and Quality of Life Outcomes. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleSF-6D utility scores of smokers and ex-smokers with or without respiratory symptoms attending primary care clinics-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CKH: carlosho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CKH=rp01931-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12955-019-1115-z-
dc.identifier.hkuros297177-
dc.identifier.volume17-
dc.identifier.spage48-
dc.identifier.epage48-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats