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Article: Stability of maxillary protraction therapy in children with Class III malocclusion: a systematic review and meta-analysis

TitleStability of maxillary protraction therapy in children with Class III malocclusion: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors
KeywordsMedium-term stability
Class III children
Maxillary protraction therapy
Systematic review and meta-analysis
Skeletal and dental changes
Issue Date2018
Citation
Clinical Oral Investigations, 2018, v. 22, n. 7, p. 2639-2652 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the stability of treatment effects of maxillary protraction therapy in Class III children. Materials and methods: Multiple electronic databases were searched from 01/1996 to 10/2016. Randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical trials, and cohort studies with untreated Class III controls and a follow-up over 2 years were considered for inclusion. The methodological quality of the studies and publication bias were evaluated. Mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of six variables (SNA, SNB, ANB, mandibular plane angle, overjet, and lower incisor angle) were calculated. Results: Ten studies were included in the qualitative analysis, and four studies were included in the quantitative analysis. Compared with the control group, after treatment, the treated group showed significant changes: SNA +1.79° (95% CI: 1.23, 2.34), SNB −1.16° (95% CI −2.08, −0.24), ANB +2.92° (95% CI 2.40, 3.44), mandibular plane angle +1.41° (95% CI 0.63, 2.20), overjet +3.94 mm (95% CI 2.17, 5.71) and lower incisor angle −3.07° (95% CI −4.92, −1.22). During follow-up, the changes in five variables reflected significant relapse. Overall, the treated group showed significant changes only in ANB +1.66° (95% CI 0.97, 2.35) and overjet +2.41 mm (95% CI 1.60, 3.23). Conclusions: Maxillary protraction can be a short-term effective therapy and might improve sagittal skeletal and dental relationships in the medium term. But some skeletal and dental variables showed significant relapse during the follow-up period. Long-term studies are still required to further evaluate its skeletal benefits. Clinical relevance: The study evaluated the medium-term stability of skeletal and dental effects of maxillary protraction in Class III children and discussed whether the therapy can reduce the need for orthognathic surgery.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267598
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.573
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.088
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Yifan-
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Runzhi-
dc.contributor.authorHou, Liyu-
dc.contributor.authorFu, Zhen-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Weiran-
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-22T04:08:28Z-
dc.date.available2019-02-22T04:08:28Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Investigations, 2018, v. 22, n. 7, p. 2639-2652-
dc.identifier.issn1432-6981-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267598-
dc.description.abstract© 2018, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the stability of treatment effects of maxillary protraction therapy in Class III children. Materials and methods: Multiple electronic databases were searched from 01/1996 to 10/2016. Randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical trials, and cohort studies with untreated Class III controls and a follow-up over 2 years were considered for inclusion. The methodological quality of the studies and publication bias were evaluated. Mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of six variables (SNA, SNB, ANB, mandibular plane angle, overjet, and lower incisor angle) were calculated. Results: Ten studies were included in the qualitative analysis, and four studies were included in the quantitative analysis. Compared with the control group, after treatment, the treated group showed significant changes: SNA +1.79° (95% CI: 1.23, 2.34), SNB −1.16° (95% CI −2.08, −0.24), ANB +2.92° (95% CI 2.40, 3.44), mandibular plane angle +1.41° (95% CI 0.63, 2.20), overjet +3.94 mm (95% CI 2.17, 5.71) and lower incisor angle −3.07° (95% CI −4.92, −1.22). During follow-up, the changes in five variables reflected significant relapse. Overall, the treated group showed significant changes only in ANB +1.66° (95% CI 0.97, 2.35) and overjet +2.41 mm (95% CI 1.60, 3.23). Conclusions: Maxillary protraction can be a short-term effective therapy and might improve sagittal skeletal and dental relationships in the medium term. But some skeletal and dental variables showed significant relapse during the follow-up period. Long-term studies are still required to further evaluate its skeletal benefits. Clinical relevance: The study evaluated the medium-term stability of skeletal and dental effects of maxillary protraction in Class III children and discussed whether the therapy can reduce the need for orthognathic surgery.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Investigations-
dc.subjectMedium-term stability-
dc.subjectClass III children-
dc.subjectMaxillary protraction therapy-
dc.subjectSystematic review and meta-analysis-
dc.subjectSkeletal and dental changes-
dc.titleStability of maxillary protraction therapy in children with Class III malocclusion: a systematic review and meta-analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00784-018-2363-8-
dc.identifier.pmid29429068-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85041924395-
dc.identifier.volume22-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage2639-
dc.identifier.epage2652-
dc.identifier.eissn1436-3771-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000441292600024-
dc.identifier.issnl1432-6981-

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