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Article: School-level electronic cigarette use prevalence and student-level tobacco use intention and behaviours

TitleSchool-level electronic cigarette use prevalence and student-level tobacco use intention and behaviours
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2019, v. 9, article no. 1690, p. 1-7 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevalent electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in schools may undermine tobacco denormalisation, and thus increase tobacco use in students. We investigated the associations of school-level e-cigarette use prevalence with student-level intention and behaviours related to e-cigarettes, cigarettes, and other tobacco products. In a 2014-15 school-based cross-sectional survey of 41035 secondary school students (grade 7–12; age 11–18 years) in Hong Kong, information was collected on the use of e-cigarettes, cigarettes, and non-cigarette tobacco products (NCTPs), susceptibility to e-cigarette and cigarette use, intention to quit cigarette smoking, and sociodemographic characteristics. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of e-cigarette use susceptibility in relation to high (vs low) school-level e-cigarette use prevalence was 1.40 (95% CI 1.05–1.87) in never e-cigarette users. The AORs of cigarette smoking susceptibility in relation to medium and high (vs low) school-level e-cigarette use prevalence were 1.24 (1.01–1.52) and 1.34 (1.02–1.75), respectively, in never cigarette smokers. School-level e-cigarette use prevalence was associated with ever and past 30-day cigarette smoking, but not with intention to quit (in past 30-day cigarette smokers) or past 30-day NCTP use. The findings highlight the importance of strictly banning e-cigarettes in schools, and add to the evidence that prevalent e-cigarette use in adolescents may increase cigarette smoking prevalence.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267459
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.122
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, J-
dc.contributor.authorHo, DSY-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, LT-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-18T09:02:30Z-
dc.date.available2019-02-18T09:02:30Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2019, v. 9, article no. 1690, p. 1-7-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/267459-
dc.description.abstractPrevalent electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in schools may undermine tobacco denormalisation, and thus increase tobacco use in students. We investigated the associations of school-level e-cigarette use prevalence with student-level intention and behaviours related to e-cigarettes, cigarettes, and other tobacco products. In a 2014-15 school-based cross-sectional survey of 41035 secondary school students (grade 7–12; age 11–18 years) in Hong Kong, information was collected on the use of e-cigarettes, cigarettes, and non-cigarette tobacco products (NCTPs), susceptibility to e-cigarette and cigarette use, intention to quit cigarette smoking, and sociodemographic characteristics. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of e-cigarette use susceptibility in relation to high (vs low) school-level e-cigarette use prevalence was 1.40 (95% CI 1.05–1.87) in never e-cigarette users. The AORs of cigarette smoking susceptibility in relation to medium and high (vs low) school-level e-cigarette use prevalence were 1.24 (1.01–1.52) and 1.34 (1.02–1.75), respectively, in never cigarette smokers. School-level e-cigarette use prevalence was associated with ever and past 30-day cigarette smoking, but not with intention to quit (in past 30-day cigarette smokers) or past 30-day NCTP use. The findings highlight the importance of strictly banning e-cigarettes in schools, and add to the evidence that prevalent e-cigarette use in adolescents may increase cigarette smoking prevalence.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleSchool-level electronic cigarette use prevalence and student-level tobacco use intention and behaviours-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHo, DSY: syho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, DSY=rp00427-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-38266-z-
dc.identifier.pmid30737443-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6368577-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85061278597-
dc.identifier.hkuros296960-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 1690, p. 1-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 1690, p. 7-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000458178100022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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