File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Pulmonary artery invasion, high-dose radiation, and overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

TitlePulmonary artery invasion, high-dose radiation, and overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer
Authors
Issue Date2014
Citation
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2014, v. 89, n. 2, p. 313-321 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose To investigate whether high-dose radiation to the pulmonary artery (PA) affects overall survival (OS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials Patients with medically inoperable/unresectable NSCLC treated with definitive radiation therapy in prospective studies were eligible for this study. Pulmonary artery involvement was defined on the basis of pretreatment chest CT and positron emission tomography/CT fusion. Pulmonary artery was contoured according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1106 atlas, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results A total of 100 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year for surviving patients were enrolled: 82.0% underwent concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Radiation dose ranged from 60 to 85.5 Gy in 30-37 fractions. Patients with PA invasion of grade ≤2, 3, 4, and 5 had 1-year OS and median survival of 67% and 25.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.7-35.1), 62% and 22.2 months (95% CI 5.8-38.6), 90% and 35.8 months (95% CI 28.4-43.2), and 50% and 7.0 months, respectively (P=.601). Two of the 4 patients with grade 5 PA invasion died suddenly from massive hemorrhage at 3 and 4.5 months after completion of radiation therapy. Maximum and mean doses to PA were not significantly associated with OS. The V45, V50, V55, and V60 of PA were correlated significantly with a worse OS (P<.05). Patients with V45 >70% or V60 >37% had significantly worse OS (13.3 vs 37.9 months, P<.001, and 13.8 vs 37.9 months, P=.04, respectively). Conclusions Grade 5 PA invasion and PA volume receiving more than 45-60 Gy may be associated with inferior OS in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266982
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 5.554
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.274
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHan, Cheng Bo-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Wei Li-
dc.contributor.authorQuint, Leslie-
dc.contributor.authorXue, Jian Xin-
dc.contributor.authorMatuszak, Martha-
dc.contributor.authorTen Haken, Randall-
dc.contributor.authorKong, Feng Ming-
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-31T07:20:10Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-31T07:20:10Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2014, v. 89, n. 2, p. 313-321-
dc.identifier.issn0360-3016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266982-
dc.description.abstractPurpose To investigate whether high-dose radiation to the pulmonary artery (PA) affects overall survival (OS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials Patients with medically inoperable/unresectable NSCLC treated with definitive radiation therapy in prospective studies were eligible for this study. Pulmonary artery involvement was defined on the basis of pretreatment chest CT and positron emission tomography/CT fusion. Pulmonary artery was contoured according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1106 atlas, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results A total of 100 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year for surviving patients were enrolled: 82.0% underwent concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Radiation dose ranged from 60 to 85.5 Gy in 30-37 fractions. Patients with PA invasion of grade ≤2, 3, 4, and 5 had 1-year OS and median survival of 67% and 25.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.7-35.1), 62% and 22.2 months (95% CI 5.8-38.6), 90% and 35.8 months (95% CI 28.4-43.2), and 50% and 7.0 months, respectively (P=.601). Two of the 4 patients with grade 5 PA invasion died suddenly from massive hemorrhage at 3 and 4.5 months after completion of radiation therapy. Maximum and mean doses to PA were not significantly associated with OS. The V45, V50, V55, and V60 of PA were correlated significantly with a worse OS (P<.05). Patients with V45 >70% or V60 >37% had significantly worse OS (13.3 vs 37.9 months, P<.001, and 13.8 vs 37.9 months, P=.04, respectively). Conclusions Grade 5 PA invasion and PA volume receiving more than 45-60 Gy may be associated with inferior OS in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiation. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics-
dc.titlePulmonary artery invasion, high-dose radiation, and overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijrobp.2014.02.011-
dc.identifier.pmid24685448-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84899994771-
dc.identifier.volume89-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage313-
dc.identifier.epage321-
dc.identifier.eissn1879-355X-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000335513800014-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats