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Article: Using acupressure to modify alertness in the classroom: A single-blinded, randomized, cross-over trial

TitleUsing acupressure to modify alertness in the classroom: A single-blinded, randomized, cross-over trial
Authors
Issue Date2005
Citation
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2005, v. 11, n. 4, p. 673-679 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Previous reports have suggested that acupressure is effective in reducing pain and improving sleep quality; however, its effects on alertness have not been characterized. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether two different acupressure treatments have opposing effects on alertness in a full-day classroom setting. Design: This was a cross-over (two-treatments; three periods), single-blinded, randomized trial. Setting: The University of Michigan School of Public Health was the setting. Subjects: Students attending a course in clinical research design and statistical analysis at the University of Michigan participated in the study. Interventions and outcome measures: Blinded subjects were randomized to two acupressure treatment sequences: stimulation-relaxation-relaxation or relaxation-stimulation-stimulation. Acupressure treatments were self administered over 3 consecutive days. Pre- and post-treatment alertness scores were assessed each day using the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS). Changes in the SSS score (afternoon - morning) were analyzed using a mixed regression model of fixed and random effects. Important factors that were expected to affect alertness, such as caffeine and previous night's sleep, were also assessed. Results: Baseline characteristics and protocol compliance were similar between the two sequences. Stimulation acupressure treatment yielded a 0.56-point greater difference in score on the SSS, corresponding to less fatigue, compared to the relaxation acupressure treatment (p = 0.019). Day of study (p -0.004) and hours of overnight sleep (p = 0.042) also significantly affected the change in SSS scores. Incorporating participants' beliefs as to which treatment they received did not significantly alter the observed treatment effect. Conclusions: Acupressure at stimulation and relaxation points has differential effects on alertness in a classroom setting. Further research is necessary to confirm these findings and to determine whether stimulation and relaxation acupressure are equally effective in influencing alertness. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266843
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.498
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.475
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Richard E.-
dc.contributor.authorJeter, Joanne-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Paul-
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Peter-
dc.contributor.authorKong, Feng Ming-
dc.contributor.authorFazel, Reza-
dc.contributor.authorBramson, Candace-
dc.contributor.authorGillespie, Brenda-
dc.contributor.authorAmmar, Khawaja Afzal-
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Michelle-
dc.contributor.authorBachuwa, Ghassan-
dc.contributor.authorBeg, Adnan-
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Devin-
dc.contributor.authorBrubaker, Linda-
dc.contributor.authorBruch, Steven-
dc.contributor.authorCazan-London, Giani-
dc.contributor.authorClark, Bobby-
dc.contributor.authorCronin, Paul-
dc.contributor.authorDeSmet, Brian-
dc.contributor.authorHamman, Gary-
dc.contributor.authorHollenbeck, Brent-
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Jaquelyn-
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Susan-
dc.contributor.authorJoshi, Sucheta-
dc.contributor.authorKayler, Liise-
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Aine-
dc.contributor.authorKenton, Kim-
dc.contributor.authorMarder, Wendy-
dc.contributor.authorMarzec, Mary-
dc.contributor.authorNeiva, Gisele-
dc.contributor.authorPeltier, Amanda-
dc.contributor.authorRao, Panduranga-
dc.contributor.authorRoys, Erik-
dc.contributor.authorRubenstein, Joel-
dc.contributor.authorSegal, Jonathan-
dc.contributor.authorSingh, T. P.-
dc.contributor.authorThamilarasan, Maran-
dc.contributor.authorThornburg, Courtney-
dc.contributor.authorTownsend, Kevin-
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Robert-
dc.contributor.authorXu, Jinping-
dc.contributor.authorZoubi, Najeeb-
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-31T07:19:46Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-31T07:19:46Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 2005, v. 11, n. 4, p. 673-679-
dc.identifier.issn1075-5535-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266843-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous reports have suggested that acupressure is effective in reducing pain and improving sleep quality; however, its effects on alertness have not been characterized. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether two different acupressure treatments have opposing effects on alertness in a full-day classroom setting. Design: This was a cross-over (two-treatments; three periods), single-blinded, randomized trial. Setting: The University of Michigan School of Public Health was the setting. Subjects: Students attending a course in clinical research design and statistical analysis at the University of Michigan participated in the study. Interventions and outcome measures: Blinded subjects were randomized to two acupressure treatment sequences: stimulation-relaxation-relaxation or relaxation-stimulation-stimulation. Acupressure treatments were self administered over 3 consecutive days. Pre- and post-treatment alertness scores were assessed each day using the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS). Changes in the SSS score (afternoon - morning) were analyzed using a mixed regression model of fixed and random effects. Important factors that were expected to affect alertness, such as caffeine and previous night's sleep, were also assessed. Results: Baseline characteristics and protocol compliance were similar between the two sequences. Stimulation acupressure treatment yielded a 0.56-point greater difference in score on the SSS, corresponding to less fatigue, compared to the relaxation acupressure treatment (p = 0.019). Day of study (p -0.004) and hours of overnight sleep (p = 0.042) also significantly affected the change in SSS scores. Incorporating participants' beliefs as to which treatment they received did not significantly alter the observed treatment effect. Conclusions: Acupressure at stimulation and relaxation points has differential effects on alertness in a classroom setting. Further research is necessary to confirm these findings and to determine whether stimulation and relaxation acupressure are equally effective in influencing alertness. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine-
dc.titleUsing acupressure to modify alertness in the classroom: A single-blinded, randomized, cross-over trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1089/acm.2005.11.673-
dc.identifier.pmid16131291-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-24644440465-
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage673-
dc.identifier.epage679-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231681300015-

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