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Article: Differential impacts of different keyboard inputting methods on reading and writing skills

TitleDifferential impacts of different keyboard inputting methods on reading and writing skills
Authors
Issue Date2018
PublisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2018, v. 8, article no. 17183 (2018) How to Cite?
AbstractNowadays, typewriting has become an important mode of written communication. A report that typewriting may hinder Chinese children’s reading development has sparked substantial concern about whether typing on electronic devices would increase the rate of reading disorders, wherein children used a pronunciation-based input system that associates alphabet letters with phonemes in standard Chinese (Putonghua) and may conflict with the traditional visuomotor-based learning processes for written Chinese. If orthographic-based input methods that require good awareness of the orthographic structure of characters are used, different outcomes might be observed. This study examined the impact of participants’ experience in different typewriting methods on the literacy abilities of fluent Chinese-English bilingual readers. We found that orthographic-based typewriting measures correlated positively with Chinese reading measures, whereas pronunciation-based typewriting measures did not correlate with Chinese reading measures but correlated positively with English reading and spelling performance. Orthographic-based typewriters also performed better than pronunciation-based typewriters in Chinese reading and dictation when their age, typewriting skills and pre-University language ability were statistically controlled. Our findings based on two contrastive writing systems suggest that typewriting methods that tally with the learning principles of a writing system should be used to promote and preserve literacy skills in the digital era.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266011
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 4.122
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSiok, WT-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CY-
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-17T02:16:32Z-
dc.date.available2018-12-17T02:16:32Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2018, v. 8, article no. 17183 (2018)-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266011-
dc.description.abstractNowadays, typewriting has become an important mode of written communication. A report that typewriting may hinder Chinese children’s reading development has sparked substantial concern about whether typing on electronic devices would increase the rate of reading disorders, wherein children used a pronunciation-based input system that associates alphabet letters with phonemes in standard Chinese (Putonghua) and may conflict with the traditional visuomotor-based learning processes for written Chinese. If orthographic-based input methods that require good awareness of the orthographic structure of characters are used, different outcomes might be observed. This study examined the impact of participants’ experience in different typewriting methods on the literacy abilities of fluent Chinese-English bilingual readers. We found that orthographic-based typewriting measures correlated positively with Chinese reading measures, whereas pronunciation-based typewriting measures did not correlate with Chinese reading measures but correlated positively with English reading and spelling performance. Orthographic-based typewriters also performed better than pronunciation-based typewriters in Chinese reading and dictation when their age, typewriting skills and pre-University language ability were statistically controlled. Our findings based on two contrastive writing systems suggest that typewriting methods that tally with the learning principles of a writing system should be used to promote and preserve literacy skills in the digital era.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleDifferential impacts of different keyboard inputting methods on reading and writing skills-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSiok, WT: siok@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySiok, WT=rp01208-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-018-35268-9-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85056963453-
dc.identifier.hkuros296253-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 17183 (2018)-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 17183 (2018)-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000450767000018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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